Archives for : CHICAGO

Dj Frankie Knuckles:GODFATHER OF HOUSE MUSIC

 

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Frankie Knuckles – a legend in the world of dance music, one of the inventors of house music, who’s worked some of the greats including Michael Jackson and Diana Ross – passed away. yesterday

Aaron E. Rifkind:Social Security Defenders

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FEES AND PAYMENT TYPES                                          Aaron Rifkind is an Illinois licensed attorney who focuses his practice to helping people with disabilities apply for and obtain Social Security, veterans, and railroad disability benefits.

Fees    Free Consultation (60 minutes)

Payment types

  Cash, Check, Credit Card
CONTACT INFORMATION
Social Security Defenders LLC
2 Lyngby Ct
Riverwoods, IL 60015
Office:                                 312-999-0999
Fax:                                 312-999-8999
Office:                                 317-550-0000

Barbara and Bobby: Scandelist Affair

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Singer Bobby Womack married Sam Cooke’s widow today (February 24,  1965).

 

 The marriage was scandalous from the start and since Bobby Womack wasn’t even  21 years old yet, he had to receive his parents’ permission.

 

But the main issue was the fact that Sam Cooke’s family was still grieving  over his death, which had occurred just three months earlier

It was Sam Cooke who discovered Bobby Womack and The Womack Brothers,  Cleveland natives who were signed to Sam Cooke’s label SAR Records.

As The Valentinos, Sam Cooke had produced the group’s single “Looking For a  Love,” as well as “It’s All Over Now,” which was re-recorded by The Rolling  Stones.

But on December 11, 1964 music history would be changed, when Sam Cooke was  shot and killed by a motel owner in East Los Angeles.

Within months of Sam Cooke’s death, Barbara Cook was flashing a new  engagement ring that was a gift from Sam’s friend Bobby Womack, who had just  proposed to her.

To make matters worse, Bobby had been seen driving around Los Angeles in  Sam’s car, along with his wife, and he was even wearing the late singer’s  clothes.

This was too much for most of Sam Cooke’s family members, including his  brother Charles Cooke Jr.

When Bobby Womack and his new wife Barbara decided to go to Chicago that  summer, they ended up in a violent confrontation with Charles. Charles, 38, went to pay the Womack’s a visit at a local motel, for what he  described as a “personal talk.”

Charles had told Bobby in so many words that he would be assaulted if he ever  showed his face in Chicago.

Bobby Womack had decided he would not live his life in fear after marrying  Barbara, so he phoned ahead to let Charles know that he would be in Chicago to  attend the wedding of Sam Cooke’s niece.

Barbara had loaded a gun with bullets in anticipation of the visit, while  Bobby Womack also prepared for the altercation.

“I figured if Charlie was going to do something, I wanted to get it over and  done with,” Bobby Womack said in his autobiography “Midnight Mover: The True  Story of the Greatest Soul Singer in the World.”

“Barbara and I flew to Chicago,” Womack said. “We checked into the Roberts  Motel and I called Charlie. I told him ‘I’m here. We’re in 2112. In the motel  room, Barbara busied herself loading bullets into a pistol. Barbara had a mean  streak in her.”

When Charles arrived with his brothers David and L.C., he pistol whipped  Bobby and beat him to the point that his teeth went through his lips, rendering  him unconscious.

“I opened the door and Charlie punched me. He beat me so bad my whole head  swelled up like a melon…he even broke my jaw,” Bobby Womack revealed.

Barbara attempted to fire the gun at Charlie, but Bobby Womack had already  taken the bullets out of the pistol, just before Charles and the rest of Sam’s  brothers arrived.

Charles Cooke was hit with a number of charges, including assault.

He was released on $1,000 bail, but since Bobby Womack refused to prosecute  Charles, the charges were eventually dropped.

For all of their troubles and tribulations, Bobby Womack’s marriage to  Barbara Cooke ended in 1970.

According to Bobby, he was also having sex with Sam Cooke’s teenaged daughter  Linda, which was too much for Barbara to take.

Bobby Womack and Barbara Cooke Womack eventually divorced in 1970.

Sam Cooke’s daughter Linda went on to marry Bobby Womack’s brother Cecil  Womack.

Linda and Cecil eventually had seven children together and moved to Africa,  where they changed their name to the Zekkarriyas

Cecil Womack passed away on February 1, 2013 in South Africa.

 

 

 

 

Mike Epps & Co

Wade and Epps chillin like two Midwest playas.998450_10153092953730268_1117058177_n

Culture of Black Chicago:Classic South Shore bungalow.

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Willie Louis: Last Man Standing

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This 2010 photo provided by Mike Small shows Willie Louis at his home in Chicago’s Englewood neighborhood. Louis, a witness who went into hiding after testifying at the Emmett Till trial in 1955 about hearing the lynching victim’s screams, died July 18, 2013, in a Chicago suburban hospital. He was 76. After the trial, Louis fled his native Mississippi for Chicago. He changed his name and told no one of his connection to the case, not even his future wife. (AP Photo/Courtesy of Mike Small)

 

2013-07-24T12:07:13Z 2013-07-24T14:09:52Z Witness to Emmett Till lynching dies in IllinoisThe Associated Press The Associated Press
23 hours ago  •  Associated Press

Hearing the screams of 14-year-old lynching victim Emmett Till from inside a Mississippi barn left a teenage field hand with an unbearable choice. He could tell a courtroom and risk paying for it with his life or keep quiet and let those screams eat away at his conscience.

Grisly photos of Till’s mutilated body, discovered three days later by a fisherman in the Tallahatchie River, left Willie Louis with no doubt about what he would do: testify at the trial of two white men accused in the black teen’s slaying.

“In the pictures, I saw his body, what it was like. Then I knew that I couldn’t say no,” Louis recalled in a 2004 “60 Minutes” interview about the testimony he gave half a century earlier.

Louis died July 18 at age 76 at a hospital in a suburb of Chicago, the city he fled to in fear of his life after the 1955 trial, his wife, Juliet Louis, said in an interview Wednesday, a few hours before her husband’s funeral service.

Till’s torture and killing in the Mississippi Delta galvanized the civil rights movement. The Chicago boy was visiting an uncle and had been warned by family to be on his best behavior in the segregated South. On Aug. 28, 1955, two white men abducted him from his uncle’s home because he had whistled at one of their wives. They admitted to the kidnapping, but claimed they just wanted to scare the boy and that they eventually turned him loose.

When his body was pulled from the river, his left eye and an ear were missing, as were most of his teeth; his nose was crushed, and there was a hole in his right temple. His body had been weighted down with a cotton gin fan tied around his neck with barbed wire.

The only witnesses prosecutors had were the boy’s uncle and a cousin, and all they could say was that they had seen Till taken away. Then, news reporters helped track down Willie Louis, who had heard the beating taking place for hours.

Despite his testimony, an all-white jury took barely an hour to acquit the two men, Roy Bryant and his half-brother J.W. Milam.

A few months later, after assurances they couldn’t be tried again, the two men confessed to the killing in a magazine article for which they were paid a few thousand dollars for the “true” story.

For his own safety, Louis had to be smuggled out of his native Mississippi and taken to Chicago. Then known as Willie Reed, he changed his last name, and was put under police protection.

Louis, a central figure in one of the most pivotal moments in America’s troubled history with race, soon drifted into obscurity.

For years, he told his story to no one, not even his future wife, who had followed the trial closely as an 11-year-old growing up in Till’s home city.

“I never really put that together that he was actually the young man that testified at the trial,” she said of her husband.

“We thought he was crazy. I know my mom said they going to kill him too.”

The couple met in the early 1970s at a hospital they worked at on Chicago’s far South Side when Louis cheekily asked the nurse’s aide for a kiss as they were lifting a patient together onto a gurney.

“So I went over to the other side and kissed him on the jaw. And that’s how we started seeing one another,” she said with a laugh.

They married in 1976, but it wasn’t until eight years later that she discovered the connection with the Till case when one of Louis’ aunts mentioned it.

She was shocked but understood that talking about it was painful for him.

“He used to have real nightmares and things,” Juliet Louis said. “All his life it bothered him. When he would talk about it, sometimes tears would be in his eyes.”

Till’s relatives, historians and documentary makers, meanwhile, had been searching for Willie Reed, wondering what had become of him.

A New York filmmaker eventually tracked him to his home in Chicago’s Englewood neighborhood, and later introduced him to Till’s mother, Mamie Till Mobley.

“She just cried when they took him over there,” Juliet Louis recalled. “They always kept in touch after that.”

Till’s mother died in 2003.

Gradually, Willie Louis began telling his story. On “60 Minutes,” he said Emmett’s screams haunted him.

“I heard this screaming, beating, screaming and beating,” he said. “And I said to myself, I said, `You know, man, they’re beating somebody in the barn.'”

Besides his wife, Louis is survived by a stepson, seven grandchildren and 21 great-grandchildren

Minnie Riperton: Angel Forever In Our Hearts!

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Willie Dixon: Happy Birthday!

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Marvin Gaye + Barbara Mason= R. Kelly!

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Aretha Franklin: THINK

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On This Day In R&B History:  On June 27, 1968 the number one cut on the R&B charts was “Think” by Aretha Franklin.

It was released as single in 1968, from her Aretha Now album. The song, a feminist anthem, reached No. 7 on Billboard Pop Singles Chart, becoming Franklin’s seventh Top 10 hit in the United States. The song also reached No. 1 on the magazine’s Black Singles Chart, becoming her sixth single to top the chart. The song was written by Franklin and Ted White. Franklin re-recorded the song in 1989 for the album “Through the Storm”. Pitchfork Media placed it at number 15 on its list of “The 200 Greatest Songs of the 1960s”.

John Dillinger: Happy 110th Birthday!

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Sam Barbara & Bobby:You, Me, and She

sam and barbaraHere’s more about what Sam’s brothers did to Bobby after he married Barbara Cooke:

Bobby Womack admits in his autobiography “Midnight Mover,” that Sam Cooke’s family had a real problem with him marrying Sam’s widow (Barbara).  Especially, Sam’s brother, Charlie.  He told Womack, shortly after the marriage, “Man, anybody else could have married Sam’s wife, but you.  Sam loved you, man.” If you ever come to Chicago…The threat was left hanging in the air but I knew what it meant.

I figured if Charlie was going to do something, I wanted to get it over and done with. Barbara and I flew to Chicago.  We checked into the ‘Roberts Motel,’ and I called Charlie.  I told him, ‘I’m here.  We’re in 2112.’ In the motel room, Barbara busied herself loading bullets into a pistol.  Barbara had a mean streak in her.

Charlie showed up with his two brothers David and L.C.  I opened the door and Charlie punched me.  He beat me so bad-my whole head swelled up like a melon. My teeth came through my lip.  He beat me unconscious.  He even broke my jaw.  Barbara came out of the bathroom screaming.

She made a grab for the gun, she pointed it and pulled the trigger.  It just clicked (I had removed the bullets while she was in the bathroom, before our guests arrived).  Charlie and his brothers left.  The cops were called, when they arrived and saw my condition, they said Charlie would do time.  They arrested him later that evening but I declined to press charges.  He was released and Barbara and I went on with our lives.

Marla Gibbs: Happy Birthday!

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Oprah Winfrey: African Pride

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Billionaire, actress, author, and talk show host Oprah is giving $12 million to a museum being built on Washington’s National Mall that will document African-American history, officials said Tuesday.

The media mogul and former talk-show host previously gave $1 million to the National Museum of African American History and Culture, and the museum says her $13 million total contribution is its largest to date. As a result, the museum’s 350-seat theater will be named after Winfrey, who is also a member of its advisory council.

Construction on the $500 million museum began in early 2012. When it’s finished in 2015, the museum will be the 19th Smithsonian museum. The U.S. government is providing half of the funding. To date, about $140 million has been raised in private funds.

“I am deeply appreciative of those who paved the path for me and all who follow in their footsteps. By investing in this museum, I want to help ensure that we both honor and preserve our culture and history, so that the stories of who we are will live on for generations to come,” Winfrey said in a statement released by the museum.

Lonnie Bunch, the museum’s director, said that Winfrey has been very involved in the museum’s creation and that he wouldn’t be surprised if she was one day on the stage of the theater that will bear her name.

The museum is also in talks with Winfrey to acquire memorabilia from her career, Bunch said. He said he’d love to have a microphone used on her television show to add to the museum’s collection of over 22,000 objects.

Those objects help tell the story of African-American history from slavery to the post-Civil War period, the civil rights era, the Harlem Renaissance and the 21st century.

Some of the highlights of the collection include a lace shawl owned by abolitionist Harriet Tubman; a Jim Crow-era segregated railroad car; slave rebellion leader Nat Turner’s Bible; and the glass-topped casket that held the body of 14-year-old Emmett Till, whose 1955 murder in Mississippi for whistling at a white woman helped spark the civil rights movement.

The museum’s most recent big acquisition was a South Carolina slave cabin that dates from the 19th century. The cabin from Edisto Island was disassembled in May in preparation for its move to the museum.

Mr. & Mrs. Obama: Power Couple!

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Judge Greg Mathis & Wife: 50th Birthday Party!

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Curtis Mayfield: Happy Birthday!

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Katherine Jackson: Happy Birthday!

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Kimi Brown Ellen: Women Of Excellence

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Kimi is a co-founding partner of Benford Brown & Associates, LLC.  Kimi has devoted a substantial portion of her career to providing audit, accounting, consulting, and tax services to companies within many different industries, including the not-for-profit, government, and telecommunications industries. 

 

As a result, Kimi has acquired several advanced skills such as not-for-profit audit and accounting, QuickBooks implementation and consulting, internal audit, risk assessment and management, and individual and corporation taxation.

Kimi is a licensed CPA in the State of Illinois. She is a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, Illinois CPA Society, National Association of Black Accountants, National Association of Female Executives, Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc., and Jack and Jill of America. 

Kimi currently serves on the Small Practice subcommittee of the Illinois CPA Society, as the President of the 87th Street Stony Island Chamber of Commerce, the board of directors of Game Time, Inc., the board of directors of Imani Pearls Community Development Foundation, and as the Treasurer for Bingham Human Services, Inc.

Kimi has worked as an auditor at Deloitte & Touche LLP and as a part of the internal audit departments of Ameritech Corporation; City Colleges of Chicago; and Ace Hardware Corporation.Kimi earned her Bachelor of Science degree in Accountancy from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Kimi Ellen, CPA- Partner
kellen@benfordbrown.com

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