Archives for : INTERNATIONAL

Lupita Nyong’o: 2014 Cannes Debut

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dress by Calvin Klein

Revue Nègre: Nigros in Paris

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Brought to France by American soldiers at the end of WWI, jazz rapidly became very popular in Paris. The “Revue Nègre” which first performed in Paris in 1925 at the Théâtre des Champs-Elysées created a sensation. The star of the show was Josephine Baker who sang and performed exotic dances often wearing nothing but a girdle of bananas.

‎BringBackOurGirls: 276

 

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On April 15, 276 Nigerian schoolgirls were kidnapped. Please RT & Share. Contact your elected officials and let’s do all we can to return them to their families. ‪#‎BringBackOurGirls

Bring Our Girls Back

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Jamie Foxx: International Player!

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When in Rome ultimate tourist for a day. Trevi fountain, the Colosseum and of course, gelato.

George Clinton: Memoir Of A Funkstar!

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Legendary funk master George Clinton is releasing is long awaited Memoir published by Atria Books with the help of writer Ben Greenman this summer, it will be an exciding, drug filed, wild battle, sexual, coming of age book, that led him into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame!

Buffy The Body: Studying Aboard?

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L’Wren Scott:(April 28, 1964 – March 17, 2014)

10003017_731693843531134_826614175_n I am still struggling to understand how my lover and best friend could end her life in this tragic way. We spent many wonderful years together and had made a great life for ourselves. She had great presence and her talent was much admired, not least by me. I have been touched by the tributes that people have paid to her, and also the personal messages of support that I have received.

I will never forget her, Mick

Josephine Baker: Trend Setter!

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Ophelia DeVore:(August 12, 1922- February 28, 2014)

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The founder of one of America’s first modeling agencies to represent women of color pioneering entrepreneur Ophelia DeVore Mitchell has passed way  yesterday at the age of 91yrs old.

Vintage Frames: February 17th-19th

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It’s been a journey, I only cherish the heartache. The labor of love was to create, product was the satisfaction. I’m was once told a debt collector couldn’t design ‪#‎sunglassses‬, behold Vintage Frames, I guess they were wrong. Overcoming all odds is possible, all it takes is the determination to survive.
Mountains can be climbed, slopes become easier on the knees after you journey for a while. We are what we make ourselves be, nobody was born with their profession. If you …have a disadvantage, all the more reason to work harder. Price your own worth, find someone that values it enough to pay it. Realize your destiny, most importantly that it is in your hands. If you are at the mercy of others, it’s time to switch games. Your present is a result of progress, your future is the result of determination.
Last time I was told I couldn’t I turned it into my future. On February 17th, I am proud to unveil Vintage Frames. It’s ‪#‎Thursday‬ pay homage to what inspired you even if it was fucking negative. Next week we show the world we could, more importantly that we did! With the unveiling of the Vintage Frames By Corey Shapiro line I have most importantly shown myself it could be done. The future has been in your hands this whole time, it’s time you realize what you have been holding all along. ‪#‎morninginspiration‬ ‪#‎vintageframes‬

Pattie Boyd: The Ultimate Trouphy!

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Patricia Anne “Pattie” Boyd (born 17 March 1944) is a model, photographer and author from the United Kingdom, best known as the first wife of both George Harrison and Eric Clapton. In August 2007, she published her autobiography Wonderful Tonight. Her photographs of Harrison and Clapton, titled Through the Eye of a Muse have been exhibited in Dublin, Sydney, Toronto, Moscow, London and throughout the United States.

Boyd was born on 17 March 1944, in Taunton, Somerset, and was the first child to Colin Ian Langdon Boyd, and Diana Frances Boyd (née Drysdale), who were married on 14 September 1942. The Boyds moved to West Lothian, Scotland where her brother Colin was born in 1946. The Boyd family moved to Guildford, Surrey, where her sister, Jenny Boyd was born in 1947.Boyd’s youngest sister, Paula, was born at Nakuru hospital, Kenya, in 1951.The Boyds lived in Nairobi, Kenya, from 1948 to 1953, after her father’s discharge from the Royal Air Force. Boyd’s parents divorced in 1952, and her mother married Robert Gaymer-Jones in February 1953, in Tanganyika (now Tanzania). The family returned to England where Boyd gained two half brothers, David J.B. (b. 1954) and Robert, Jr. (b. 1955).

Boyd attended Hazeldean School in Putney, the St Agnes and St Michael Convent Boarding School in East  Grinstead, and St Martha’s Convent in Hadley Wood, Hertfordshire (where she received three GCE O level passes in 1961). Boyd moved to London in 1962 and worked as a shampoo girl at Elizabeth Arden‘s salon, until a client who worked for a fashion magazine inspired her to begin work as a model.

Boyd began her fashion career in 1962, modelling in London, New York and Paris. She was photographed by David Bailey and Terence Donovan, and appeared on the cover of Vogue. Boyd appeared on the cover of the UK and Italian editions of Vogue magazine in 1969, with other popular models of the day, such as Twiggy, who based her early modelling appearance on Boyd. Boyd was asked by Gloria Stavers to write a column for 16 Magazine, and appeared in a TV commercial promoting Smith’s crisps. She was cast for A Hard Day’s Night, where she met George Harrison.

Boyd exhibited her photos of Harrison and Clapton, at the San Francisco Art Exchange on Valentine’s Day 2005, in a show entitled Through the Eye of a Muse. The exhibition appeared in San Francisco and London during 2006, and in La Jolla, California in 2008.Boyd’s photography was shown in Dublin and in Toronto in 2008 and at the Blender Gallery in Sydney, Australia and in Almaty, Kazakhstan in 2009 and 2010. Her exhibit “Yesterday and Today: The Beatles and Eric Clapton” was shown in Santa Catalina Island in California, and at the National Geographic Headquarters in Washington, DC in 2011.

In 2007 Boyd published her autobiography, which includes some of her photographs, titled Wonderful Today in the UK; in the US it was published with the title Wonderful Tonight: George Harrison, Eric Clapton, and Me. In the United States, Boyd’s book debuted at the top of the New York Times Best Seller list.

1964, Boyd met Harrison during the filming of A Hard Day’s Night, in which she was cast as a schoolgirl.[12][23] Her only line in the film was asking “Prisoners?”, but she later appeared in the “I Should Have Known Better” segment. Boyd was “semi-engaged” to photographer Eric Swayne at the time, thus declining a date proposal from Harrison. Several days later, after ending her relationship with Swayne, she went back to work on the film and Harrison asked her out on a date for a second time. The couple went to a private gentlemen’s club called the Garrick Club, chaperoned by the Beatles’ manager, Brian Epstein. According to Boyd, one of the first things Harrison said to her on the film set was: “Will you marry me? Well, if you won’t marry me, will you have dinner with me tonight?”

Boyd had her first encounter with LSD in early 1965 when the couple’s dentist, John Riley, secretly laced her coffee with the drug during a dinner party at his home.[As she was getting ready to leave with Harrison, John and Cynthia Lennon, Riley told them that he had spiked their drinks and tried to convince them to stay.Outside, Boyd was in an agitated state from the drug and threatened to break a store window, but Harrison pulled her away. Later, when Boyd and her group were in an elevator on their way up to the Ad Lib club, they mistakenly believed it was on fire.

Later that year, Boyd moved into Kinfauns with Harrison.The couple were engaged on 25 December 1965, and married on 21 January 1966, in a ceremony at a registry office in Ashley Road, Epsom, with Paul McCartney as best man. Later, the couple went on a honeymoon in Barbados. In September, Boyd flew with Harrison to Bombay to visit sitar virtuoso Ravi Shankar, before returning to London on 23 October 1966. The following year, Boyd attended the Our World broadcast of “All You Need Is Love“.

Through her interest in Eastern mysticism and her membership in the Spiritual Regeneration Movement, she inspired all four Beatles to meet the Indian mystic Maharishi Mahesh Yogi in London on 24 August 1967, which resulted in a visit to the Maharishi’s seminar in Bangor, the following day. Boyd accompanied Harrison on the Beatles’ visit to the Maharishi’s ashram in Rishikesh, India, in February 1968.In March 1970, Boyd moved with Harrison from Kinfauns to Friar Park, a Victorian neo-Gothic mansion, in Henley-on-Thames.

In 1973, Boyd’s marriage to Harrison began to fail and she had an affair with Faces guitarist Ronnie Wood. She separated from Harrison in 1974 and their divorce was finalised on 9 June 1977.Boyd said her decision to end their marriage and leave Harrison was based largely on his repeated infidelities, culminating in an affair with Ringo Starr‘s wife Maureen, which Boyd called “the final straw”. Boyd characterised the last year of her marriage as “fuelled by alcohol and cocaine”, and claimed “George used coke excessively, and I think it changed him … it froze his emotions and hardened his heart.”According to Boyd, Harrison’s songs “I Need You” and “Something” were written for her.

Marriage to Eric Clapton

In the late 1960s, Clapton and Harrison became close friends, and began writing and recording music together. At this time Clapton fell in love with Boyd.His 1970 album with Derek and the Dominos, Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs, was written to proclaim his love for her, particularly the hit song “Layla“.When Boyd rebuffed his advances late that year, Clapton descended into heroin addiction and self-imposed exile for three years. Boyd moved in with Clapton and married him in 1979

. Her struggles within the marriage were masked by her public image with Clapton. Although Boyd drank and admits to past drug use, she never became an alcoholic or a drug addict like Clapton did. Boyd left Clapton in September 1984, and divorced him in 1988. Her stated reasons were Clapton’s years of alcoholism, as well as his numerous affairs including one with Italian model Lory Del Santo. In 1989, her divorce was granted on the grounds of “infidelity and unreasonable behaviour”.Boyd believes she was the inspiration for the songs: “Bell Bottom Blues” and “Wonderful Tonight“.

 

 

 

Floyd Mayweather:International player!

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Up early eating breakfast on the balcony of my Presidential Suite in Hawaii. Just enjoying life!  www.themoneyteam.com

Vintage Black Glamour: By Nichelle Gainer

 

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I want to thank everyone who has expressed interest in my book and, at long last, I am happy to give you some book news! The book is scheduled to be published in Spring 2014 and starting today, you can visit vintageblackglamourBOOK.com and …register your interest in the book.

Registering is different from pre-ordering (available starting early February). My publisher, Rocket 88 an imprint of London-based Essential Works, has created this website to establish the level in interest in the book. After you register you will be contacted by email in early 2014 with further details about the book and, if you wish, you may pre-order the book at that time. Once again, thank you so much! More links are in the comment section ~ Nichelle Gainer http://vintageblackglamourbook.com/

Vintage Black Glamour by Nichelle Gainer (Spring 2014, Essential Works/Rocket 88 books). http://bit.ly/VBGbook
Description.

Vintage Black Glamour is a forthcoming book (Spring 2014, Essential Works/Rocket 88 Books) and visual tribute to some of the glamorous, accomplished and often groundbreaking black women – legendary and obscure – of the 20th century.

Zora Neal Hurston:Happy Birthday!

ZORABorn in Alabama on January 7, 1891, Zora Neale Hurston spent her early adulthood studying at various universities and collecting folklore from the South, the Caribbean and Latin America. She published her findings in Mules and Men. Hurston was a fixture of the Harlem Renaissance, rubbing shoulders with many of its famous writers. In 1937, she published her masterwork of fiction, Their Eyes Were Watching God. Hurston died in Florida in 1960.

Born on January 7, 1891, in Notasulga, Alabama, writer Zora Neale Hurston created several acclaimed works of fiction, including the novel Their Eyes Were Watching God. She was also an outstanding folklorist and anthropologist who  worked to record the stories and tales of many cultures, including her own African-American heritage.

Hurston was the daughter of two former slaves. Her father, John Hurston, was a pastor, and he moved the family to Florida when Hurston was very young. Following the death of her mother, Lucy Ann (Potts) Hurston, in 1904, and her father’s subsequent remarriage, Hurston lived with an assortment of family members for the next few years.

To support herself and finance her efforts to get an education, Hurston worked a variety of jobs, including as a maid for an actress in a touring Gilbert and Sullivan group. In 1920, Hurston earned an associate degree from Howard University. She published one of her earliest works in the university’s newspaper. A few years later, she moved to New York City’s Harlem neighborhood, where she became a fixture in the area’s thriving art scene.

Living in Harlem in the 1920s, Hurston befriended the likes of Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen, among several others. Her apartment, according to some accounts, was a popular spot for social gatherings. Around this time, Hurston experienced a few early literary successes, including placing in short-story and playwriting contests in Opportunity magazine.

Hurston also had serious academic interests. She landed a scholarship to Barnard College, where she pursued the subject of anthropology and studied with Franz Boas. In 1927, Hurston returned to Florida to collect African-American folk tales. She would later publish a collection of these stories, entitled Mules and Men (1935). Hurston also contributed articles to magazines, including the Journal of American Folklore.

Also in the mid-1930s, Hurston explored the fine arts through a number of different projects. She worked with Langston Hughes on a play called Mule-Bone: A Comedy of Negro Life—disputes over the work would eventually lead to a falling out between the two writers—and wrote several other plays, including The Great Day and From Sun to Sun.

Hurston released her first novel, Jonah’s Gourd Vine, in 1934. Two years later, she received a Guggenheim fellowship, which allowed her to work on what would become her most famous work: Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937). She wrote the novel while traveling in Haiti, where she also studied local voodoo practices.

That same year, Hurston spent time in Jamaica conducting anthropological research.

In 1942, Hurston published her autobiography, Dust Tracks on a Road. This personal work was well-received by critics, but her life and career soon began to falter. Hurston was charged with molesting a 10-year-old boy in 1948; despite being able to prove that she was out of the country at the time of the incident, she suffered greatly from this false accusation.

Despite all of her accomplishments, Hurston struggled financially and personally during her final decade. She kept writing, but she had difficulty getting her work published. Additionally, she experienced some backlash for her criticism of the 1955 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education, which called for the end of school segregation.

A few years later, Hurston had suffered several strokes and was living in the St. Lucie County Welfare Home. The once-famous writer and folklorist died poor and alone on January 28, 1960, and was buried in an unmarked grave in Fort Pierce, Florida.

More than a decade later, another great talent helped to revive interest in Hurston and her work: Alice Walker wrote about Hurston in the essay “In Search of Zora Neale Hurston,” published in Ms. magazine in 1975. Walker’s essay helped introduce Hurston to a new generation of readers, and encouraged publishers to print new editions of Hurston’s long-out-of-print novels and other writings. In addition to Walker, Hurston heavily influenced Toni Morrison and Ralph Ellison, among other writers.

© 2014 A+E Networks. All rights reserved.

High Priced Escort: $20,000 a night!

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They have supermodel looks, an athlete’s stamina, the social skills of a diplomat — and sleep with the world’s wealthiest men. In the current Tatler Charlotte Edwardes meets London’s ‘top girls’

Dark red, you know the one, like blood. I forget the name. Anyway, he wants that on your toes. Light-pink manicure — fresh, innocent. So what’s next? Underwear, yes. He wants you in La Perla, off-white. Corsetry. Nothing whorish.”

Lauren [not her real name], 31, is mimicking her madam, putting on a breathy Parisian accent. “He’s a nice guy, veeery discreet. Remember: act like you know him. Packing, let’s see: a cocktail dress — black — whips, lube…”

She laughs, returning to her own voice, which has a faint Scandinavian lilt. “And that was my life for 10 years. I was  a high-class hooker. Call me a courtesan, call girl, escort, whatever. Basically I was a hooker. Just very well paid.” She looks at her ring, an enormous pear-shaped diamond. “Very well paid.”

There is an enduring fascination with illicit sex in high places. Perhaps it’s the access to some of the world’s richest, most powerful men, the secrets, the scandal, and, of course, the sexual prowess of these girls, which is riveting to us all.

Hollywood sirens like Marilyn Monroe (who made ****ographic films in her early career) and Joan Crawford (who worked in a strip club) reportedly sold sex too. And there was a media scramble to unmask the blogging call girl Belle de Jour (eventually revealed as Dr Brooke Magnanti), who was trading sex while studying for a PhD. She took her alluring nom de plume from the French novel of 1928, made into a film with Catherine Deneuve in 1967.

On condition of anonymity (“I don’t want my legs broken”), Lauren has agreed to talk about her life as a high-class prostitute. She earned £20,000 a night at her peak and £40,000 for a weekend.

“No one earns that money now,” she says. “Prices have gone down in the last five years. Changing times. My clients were on the Forbes list. Men who owned private islands, who were huge in property, international industry and oil. I’ve had dinner with royalty and major politicians. If you knew who! These clients were powerful, powerful men.’

Aristocrats? “No. They don’t pay. It’s new money. Having a hooker for them is nothing — like having butter on their bread. Sometimes their wives knew and turned a blind eye, sometimes they didn’t know.”

We are drinking tea in Lauren’s house in Chelsea. She lives with her husband, who was not a client — “I got lucky” — and who disapproves of her talking about her past.

She says her look — extraordinary pale hair, gas-blue eyes, peachy skin — was “the look everyone wanted. They don’t want skinny models, they want a little bit of …” she plumps her neat cleavage … “but nothing fake. No fake boobs, nails or eyelashes.”

Like others girls in her earnings bracket, Lauren is clever. She speaks Swedish, French and English. She used to read the Financial Times and The Economist to stay abreast of world events, as well as fashion magazines.

‘These clients want someone who can hold a conversation at a cocktail party or dinner — as well as everything else.”

Lauren says there are two major madams in London now, and they supply girls all over Europe and to the US. One is English — “big woman. Looks like a frog”. Lauren’s was French — “in her fifties, very elegant”.

She lives in north-west London and has dominated the industry for 20 years. She has “the best girls. They are seriously beautiful”.

How does her madam recruit? “She has people who work like model scouts, trawling clubs and bars and parties. And girls find her. Mostly they are models, strippers or dancers. Or students. They are smart and pretty. There are young actresses too. Sometimes recognisable faces.”

Lauren’s madam worked with a man who was “friendly with all the top model agencies. He’d pretend to be a Saudi prince and sleep with models. Then he’d tell them they could earn £10,000 a night and they’d say, ‘Oh really? Here’s my number’.”

At other times, he might proposition a pretty girl by offering large amounts of money for sex. “Ninety-nine per cent of the time she’ll tell him where to go. But the seed is planted. Next time she sees him, she might say, ‘Okay, tell me more’.”

Her madam would ask this same male friend to “test out” new girls. “He would report back and say, ‘She did this, she did that, she was good. I’d put her in the top bracket’. Or he’d say, ‘She’s a bit mediocre, so she might be a £1,000-a-night job as opposed to a £10,000’. There’s also a place in Paris she sends top girls to learn about sex — all the tricks. Paris is unbelievable for that stuff.”

Are the girls nervous? She laughs. “You can’t have nerves! These girls are tough. And there’s a numbness — it’s work. We don’t care about clients.”

Today, many of the girls are from Russia or Eastern Europe, she says, but others are from “all over — America, Brazil, South Africa, the Far East”.

The madam has around 100 girls on her books. “The very least you’ll be paying is £1,000 a night — those are the get-’em-in, get-’em-out service girls.” They’re booked for events like weekend shoots, or to sit in a nightclub making some sleazy guy look good. The mid-range are the majority — £5,000 a night upwards. Most of the mid-range guys aren’t mega-mega — they’re wealthy-banker league.”

Girls are sent “to etiquette classes, to learn how to sit, eat, which knife, fork, which glass for the white, for the red. It can’t be obvious to the other dinner guests that she’s a prostitute”.

She tells of a girl from a fabulous background who fell in love with a client. “He left his wife and three children for her.” Do many girls marry out of the game? “Not as many as you’d think,” she says. “It’s not Pretty Woman. But then again, a lot of society women started out this way.”

So what makes a £10,000–£20,000 girl? “Looks and training. We were professionals. We’d need to be funny, a laugh, party all night. Or cool and clever, discreet and well-mannered. You could never be fazed by power or money — or what you were asked to do.”

She says the top girls are “healthy”. “They go to the gym. They don’t do drugs, smoke or drink. Sometimes you’re up all night, so you need to look after yourself.”

The top 10 are “champion racehorses”. Others are “more hard-wearing”. “An absolutely stunning girl might not be so bright, or her English isn’t good. She’ll go to Arab clients. They want a beautiful girl they can lock in a room and bang, bang, bang.” She pauses. “But they pay well.”

Does that mean other clients treat girls well? “Yes, but…” She takes a deep breath. “A lot of these guys are seriously f***ed up. Their wives don’t do what they want. No woman in her sane mind would do half of it.”

She remembers being put in “an exceptionally expensive outfit so that the client could urinate on it”. One European royal “who has hookers all the time” is so rough that Lauren’s madam refuses to send her best girls. A famous film director offered to make Lauren famous “if I didn’t use a condom”. She refused.

“One guy — you definitely know his name — wanted to be a baby girl dressed as a ballerina. We had to smack him and put things up his bum.”

In addition to her fees (which were paid to the madam — “no money changes hands with the girl”), clients would take her shopping. “Getting jewellery is key. That’s an investment. The girls are big savers — they don’t spend their own money. If they start young — 18 is a good age — and do 10 to 12 years of hard work, they’re made.”

Retirement age is usually 28, “latest 30. They need to earn enough to put away for their future”. Lauren invested in property.

She says there’s an upper echelon of exclusive prostitutes who charge a premium for their celebrity. Lauren cites six, including a former Victoria’s Secret model who charged £25,000 an hour.

Through Lauren I meet Anna [not her real name], 24, who is still working as a prostitute. She wears Isabel Marant and Chanel. She’s braless under her white T-shirt but it doesn’t look tarty. She’s the kind of girl you might see hoicking her modelling portfolio around Paris.

She remembers the “cheap fake-fur coat” she was wearing when she stepped off the plane five years ago from Russia. Her modelling career failed because “there were a million girls like me at the agency. I couldn’t earn proper money”.

Anna refuses to discuss her madam but says she was introduced by another model. She’s been taken to Wimbledon, the Serpentine Party, Ibiza, Monaco and the Frieze Art Fair. Most of her clients are financiers — “hedge funders, CEOs, rich businessmen. I can make £5,000 a night. Sometimes £10,000 or £15,000 for a weekend.”

Clients want “everyone to think they’re going out with a model”.

“They don’t want you to dress like a hooker. You need to look natural. Don’t dress like their wives,” she smiles. “Although most of their wives try to dress like us.”

I ask Anna how she sees her future. “Maybe I’ll marry a rich man,” she says. “If not, I’ll start my own business.” Does she think she’ll ever fall in love? Have children? Have a normal life? “Maybe. I hope.” She shrugs. “It’s hard to think about it. Right now, I just want to make money.”

http://www.standard.co.uk/lifestyle/…r-9041116.html

Juanita Moore:October 19, 1914-January 1, 2014

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Juanita Moore (October 19, 1914 – January 1, 2014) was an American film, television, and stage actress. She was the fifth African American to be nominated for an Academy Award in any category, and the third in the Supporting Actress category at a time when only a single African American had won an Oscar. Her most famous role was as Annie Johnson in the movie Imitation of Life (1959).

 

Born in Los Angeles in 1914, Moore was a chorus girl at the Cotton Club before becoming a film extra while working in theater. After making her film debut in Pinky (1949),[1] she had a number of bit parts and supporting roles in motion pictures through the 1950s and 1960s. However, her role in Imitation of Life (1959), a remake, as housekeeper Annie Johnson, whose daughter Sarah Jane (Susan Kohner) passes for white, won her a nomination for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. She was also nominated for the Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture for the role.[2] When the two versions of Imitation of Life were released together on DVD, the earlier film was released in 1934, one of the bonus features was a new interview with Juanita Moore.

Moore continued to perform in front of the camera, with a role in the movie Disney’s The Kid (2000) and guest-starring roles on television shows Dragnet, Marcus Welby, M.D., ER and Judging Amy.

On April 23, 2010, a new print of Imitation of Life (1959) was screened at the TCM Film Festival in Los Angeles, to which Moore and co-star Kohner were invited. After the screening, the two women appeared on stage for a question-and-answer session hosted by TCM’s Robert Osborne. Moore and Kohner received standing ovations.

Moore was married for 50 years to Charles Burris; he died in 2001. He was a Los Angeles bus driver and, although she was a frequent passenger, she had stepped out in front of his approaching bus to cross the street to a local bar, hoping to find someone to study for the Inès Serrano role in the play No Exit—Serrano was a lesbian, and Moore was unfamiliar with the lifestyle. She and Burris married a few weeks later.

Her grandson is actor/producer Kirk Kelley-Kahn, who is CEO/President of “Cambridge Players – Next Generation”, a theatre troupe whose founding members included Moore, Esther Rolle, Helen Martin, Lynn Hamilton and Royce Wallace.[

Moore died at her home in Los Angeles on January 1, 2014, from natural causes. She was 99 years old.

Sara Blakely: Spanx Undergarment

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#1 Sara Blakely: Spanx Undergarment

The American Dream still exists with today’s youngest self-made female billionaire.  She’s the inventor who helps women slim down with the popular elastic underpants, Spanx.

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Ike & Tina: The Early Years!

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Beyonce:Sydney- Halloween Edition ;-)

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This website content was created with the help of Ultimate Tinymce!

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