Archives for : MURDER

September 9, 1996: The Aftermath

10628371_652718211493719_2883936511414953892_n

 

 

September 9, 1996: 8PM: “Metro Police and about 20 friends and fans of 2pac are in an altercation over what police call a “missunderstanding”. Tensions are calmed with help from a female friend of Shakur’s and four men originally handcuffed during the scuffle are released. No one was arrested. Police have been patrolling outside the hospital out of concern for retaliation after the shooting.” Source: Las Vegas Sun

September 8, 1996: The Morning After

10685380_652198684879005_4565104176847586788_n

 

September 8, 1996: 11AM: Suge Knight is released from the University Medical Center. 6:20PM: 2pac undergoes a second operation at UMC to repair damage from bullet wounds. Source: Las Vegas Sun, Cathy Scott.

Emmett Till (July 25, 1941 – August 28, 1955)

 

 

10421255_10152324983599677_2482338599566557419_n

 

 

In memory, Emmett Till (July 25, 1941 – August 28, 1955). Lynched this day in history. Till was crucified by the mainstream press. Headlines from newspapers such as the Washington Post referred to him as the “Wolf-Whistler.”

(A 9/19/1955 article in the Post begins: “Two white men, accused of killing a wolf-whistling Negro boy, went on trial in a steamy Mississippi Delta courtroom today, their two-year-old boys in their laps.”

Till’s mother’s courageous decision, to have an open casket funeral and share photos of his mutilated body with the world, helped inspire the modern civil rights movement. Here are classroom resources about Emmett Till: http://bit.ly/1mWtVm4 A key primary document is the Look Magazine interview with the murderers: http://to.pbs.org/1AXAqx9

Marilyn Monroe (June 1, 1926 – August 5, 1962)

3301-o

On this date in 1962, Hollywood star Marilyn Monroe was found dead at the age of 36yrs old.

New York, August 5

Marilyn Monroe was found dead in bed this morning in her home in Hollywood, only a physical mile or two, but a social universe, away from the place where she was born 36 years ago as Norma Jean Baker. She died with a row of medicines and an empty bottle of barbiturates at her elbow.

These stony sentences, which read like the epitaph of a Raymond Chandler victim, will confirm for too many millions of movie fans the usual melodrama of a humble girl, cursed by physical beauty, to be dazed and doomed by the fame that was too much for her. For Americans, the last chapter was written on the weekend that a respectable national picture magazine printed for the delectation of her troubled fans a confessional piece called “Marilyn Monroe pours out her soul.”

The plot of her early life is as seedy as anything in the pulp magazines, and to go into the details now would be as tasteless as prying into the clinical file of any other pretty woman whose beauty has crumbled overnight. It is enough, for summoning the necessary compassion, to recall her miserable parents, her being shuttled like a nuisance from foster home to orphanage, the subsequent knockabout years in a war factory, her short independence as a sailor’s wife, the unsuspected first rung of the ladder provided by a posing job for a nude calendar.

She talked easily about all this, when people had the gall to ask her, not as someone reconciled to a wretched childhood but as a wide-eyed outsider, an innocent as foreign to the subject under discussion as Chaplin is when he stands off and analyses the appeal of ” The Little Man.”

Then she wiggled briefly past the lecherous gaze of Louis Calhern in John Huston’s ” Asphalt Jungle,” and his appraising whinny echoed round the globe. Within two years she was the enthroned sexpot of the Western world. She completed the first phase of the American dream by marrying the immortal Joe Di Maggio, the loping hero of the New York Yankees; and the second phase by marrying Arthur Miller and so redeeming his suspect Americanism at the moment it was in question before a House committee.

To say that Marilyn Monroe was a charming, shrewd, and pathetic woman of a tragic integrity will sound as preposterous to the outsider as William Empson’s Freudian analysis of Alice in Wonderland. It is nevertheless true. We restrict the word “integrity” to people, either simple or complex, who have a strong sense of righteousness or, if they are public men, of self-righteousness. Yet it surely means no more than what it says: wholeness, being free to be spontaneous, without reck of consistency or moral appearances. It can be true of forlorn and bewildered people as of the disciplined and the solemn.

In this sense, Marilyn Monroe was all of a piece. She was confused, pathologically shy, a straw on the ocean of her compulsions (to pout, to crackwise, to love a stranger, to be six hours late or lock herself in a room). She was a sweet and humorous person increasingly terrified by the huge stereotype of herself she saw plastered all around her. The exploitation of this pneumatic, mocking, liquid-lipped goddess gave the world a simple picture of the Lorelei. She was about as much of a Lorelei as Bridget, the housemaid.

This orphan of the rootless City of the Angels at last could feel no other identity than the one she saw in the mirror: a baffled, honest girl forever haunted by the nightmare of herself, 60 feet tall and naked before a howling mob. She could never learn to acquire the lacquered shell of the prima donna or the armour of sophistication. So in the end she sought the ultimate oblivion, of which her chronic latecomings and desperate retreats to her room were token suicides.

All Eyez on Me:Diamond

imagesHZABBDAC

 

The Late great Rapper Tupac Shakur’s double album, All Eyez on Me, has been certified as “Diamond” status by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), representing more than 10 million copies sold.

Eric Garner:Death By A Coward

 

 

unnamed

NY Medical Examiner has ruled the death of Staten Island-resident Eric Garner A Homicide.

The Move Organization: 29th Anniversary

 

untitled

 

May 13th marks the 29th Anniversary of the MOVE bombing, in which Philadelphia police dropped an explosive from a helicopter in an attempt to end an armed standoff.

The Move Organization is a Black Liberation group from Philadelphia started by John Africa in 1972. In 1985 the group made national news when police dropped a bomb on their house on 6221 Osage Avenue from a helicopter in an attempt to end an armed impasse. The explosion and ensuing fire killed 11 people, including five children and the group’s leader, John Africa. Only two occupants survived—Ramona Africa and Birdie, a child. 60 homes were destroyed as the entire block burned.

Mayor W. Wilson Goode appointed an investigative commission called the MOVE commission. It issued its report on March 6, 1986. The report denounced the actions of the city government, stating that “Dropping a bomb on an occupied row house was unconscionable.” No one from the city government was charged criminally.

In a 1996 civil suit in US federal court, a jury ordered the City of Philadelphia to pay $1.5 million to a survivor and relatives of two people killed in the bombing. The jury found that the city used excessive force and violated the members’ constitutional protection against unreasonable search and seizure. Philadelphia was given the sobriquet “The City that Bombed Itself.”

“King-Abernathy suite”.

10155626_1394849937459239_441880260_n
Ralph Abernathy testified to the United States House Select Committee on Assassinations that King and his entourage stayed at room 306 at the Lorraine Motel so often it was known as the “King-Abernathy suite”. According to Jesse Jackson, King’s last words on the balcony were spoken to musician Ben Branch, who was scheduled to perform that night at an event King was attending: “Ben, make sure you play ‘Take My Hand, Precious Lord’ in the meeting tonight. Play it real pretty.”
At 6:01 p.m., April 4, 1968, a shot rang out as King stood on the motel’s second-floor balcony. The bullet entered through his right cheek, smashing his jaw, then traveled down his spinal cord before lodging in his shoulder.  Abernathy heard the shot from inside the motel room and ran to the balcony to find King on the floor.
King’s autopsy revealed that though only 39 years old, he “had the heart of a 60 year old”, which was attributed to the stress of 13 years in the civil rights movement.

Marvin Gaye: 30th Anniversary

1970752_631963420210245_172272568_n

Marvin Gaye: (April 2, 1939-April 1, 1939)

thPBCMNBK8

Marvin Pentz Gay, Jr. was born on April 2, 1939 in Washington D.C. to Marvin Gay, Sr., a preacher, and Alberta Gay (née Cooper) , a housewife and schoolteacher. He first grew up in a house located at 1617 First Street SW, only a few blocks from the Anacostia River. The First Street neighborhood was nicknamed “Simple City” owing to its being “half-city, half country”. …

When Marvin was in his teens, the family relocated to the Deanwood section of north eastern D.C. Marvin was the second eldest of Marvin Gay, Sr.’s children and the third overall of six. He had two sisters: Jeanne and Zeola, and three brothers: Michael Cooper, Frankie Gaye and Antwaun Gaye. Michael Cooper was from his mother’s previous relationship while Antwaun was born as a result of his father’s extramarital affairs.

The middle child of three children, Marvin Gaye’s childhood can be characterized by developing an early love of music. Marvin Gaye’s introduction to music began by singing in his father’s church choir accompanied by his father on piano, when he was only three years old. Marvin and his family were part of a Pentecostal church known as the House of God. The House of God took its teachings from Hebrew Pentecostalism, advocated strict conduct, and adhered to both the Old and New Testaments. He expanded his musical abilities by learning how to play the piano and drums. He was encouraged by his mother to pursue a professional music career after a performance at a school play.

Marvin attended Cardozo High School and joined several doo-wop vocal groups, including the Dippers and the D.C. Tones. The younger Marvin’s relationship with his father worsened during his teenage years as his father would kick him out of the house for what he perceived was misbehavior. Following an argument in which he stood up against his father, the younger Marvin walked out of the house for good and dropped out of high school. With dreams of being a flyer, 17-year-old Marvin enlisted in the United States Air Force as a Basic Airman. Disappointed in having to perform menial tasks, he faked mental illness and was discharged shortly afterwards. Gaye’s sergeant stated that Marvin refused to follow orders.

John Singleton: ALL EYEZ ON ME

1654128_10152222866102855_1053158522_n

John Singleton signs on to direct the Tupac Shakur biopic

Geraldine McGee Rosenthal: The Real Ginger!

frank-and-geri-rosenthal

 

Geraldine (Geri) McGee Rosenthal (May 16, 1936 – November 9, 1982) was the second wife of Las Vegas sports handicapper, Frank Rosenthal. She provided the basis for the character of “Ginger,” portrayed by Sharon Stone in the 1995 movie Casino. Geri and her sister, Barbara, grew up in the Sherman Oaks community of Los AngelesSan Fernando Valley and went to Van Nuys High School with Robert Redford and Don Drysdale.

Geri started going out with Lenny Marmor in high school. Their daughter, Robin L Marmor, was born December 27, 1957, in Los Angeles, and Lenny, who never married her though he was married three times to other women, talked Geri into moving to Las Vegas. Geraldine met Anthony Spilotro while at a convention in Atlantic City. She had an affair with him at that time. Later, after marrying Rosenthal the affair with Spilotro would resume.

When Frank met Geri, she had been hustling in Las Vegas for close to eight years. She owned her own house and was raising her 11-year-old daughter Robin, who was fathered by her high school sweetheart Lenny Marmor. Geri supported her ailing mother, Alice Pollock McGee, and her sister, Barbara Stokich (b. Feb 6 1934, d. May 7, 2000), who had been abandoned with two young sons after her husband left. In 1954, Geri’s aunt (her father’s sister) received a large inheritance.

Geri’s aunt offered to send Geri to Woodbury Business School, as she had Geri’s sister Barbara, but Geri wanted to go to UCLA or USC. Instead she got a job at Thirty Drugs, then as a teller for Bank of America. Lenny would visit Geri and their daughter, usually for two or three days, often with the intention to borrow money for a “surefire” business deal. Occasionally, her father, Roy McGee, a California auto mechanic long separated from her mother, would visit. Besides Marmor and Rosenthal, Geri was also seeing John Hicks. Johnny Hicks was about 10 years younger than Geri. She adored Hicks and some believed he would have married her, except he had very rich parents who objected to the relationship.

The Hicks owned the Algiers Hotel and the Thunderbird Casino and didn’t want the couple to wed. Johnny Hicks had a $1,000-a-month trust fund and would have had it taken away if he married Geri. Johnny liked to act as a tough guy and hung around Downtown Las Vegas with a crew that used to beat up prostitutes.

 

Frank and Geri were married on May 1, 1969. They had two children, Steven and Stephanie. Their divorce was final January 16, 1981. Geraldine Rosenthal died from a drug overdose Nov. 9, 1982, and was buried at Mount Sinai Cemetery in Los Angeles. Frank Rosenthal spent $50,000 to have a private autopsy conducted.

Barbara and Bobby: Scandelist Affair

Barbara-Cooke-and-Bobby-Womack-630x350

Singer Bobby Womack married Sam Cooke’s widow today (February 24,  1965).

 

 The marriage was scandalous from the start and since Bobby Womack wasn’t even  21 years old yet, he had to receive his parents’ permission.

 

But the main issue was the fact that Sam Cooke’s family was still grieving  over his death, which had occurred just three months earlier

It was Sam Cooke who discovered Bobby Womack and The Womack Brothers,  Cleveland natives who were signed to Sam Cooke’s label SAR Records.

As The Valentinos, Sam Cooke had produced the group’s single “Looking For a  Love,” as well as “It’s All Over Now,” which was re-recorded by The Rolling  Stones.

But on December 11, 1964 music history would be changed, when Sam Cooke was  shot and killed by a motel owner in East Los Angeles.

Within months of Sam Cooke’s death, Barbara Cook was flashing a new  engagement ring that was a gift from Sam’s friend Bobby Womack, who had just  proposed to her.

To make matters worse, Bobby had been seen driving around Los Angeles in  Sam’s car, along with his wife, and he was even wearing the late singer’s  clothes.

This was too much for most of Sam Cooke’s family members, including his  brother Charles Cooke Jr.

When Bobby Womack and his new wife Barbara decided to go to Chicago that  summer, they ended up in a violent confrontation with Charles. Charles, 38, went to pay the Womack’s a visit at a local motel, for what he  described as a “personal talk.”

Charles had told Bobby in so many words that he would be assaulted if he ever  showed his face in Chicago.

Bobby Womack had decided he would not live his life in fear after marrying  Barbara, so he phoned ahead to let Charles know that he would be in Chicago to  attend the wedding of Sam Cooke’s niece.

Barbara had loaded a gun with bullets in anticipation of the visit, while  Bobby Womack also prepared for the altercation.

“I figured if Charlie was going to do something, I wanted to get it over and  done with,” Bobby Womack said in his autobiography “Midnight Mover: The True  Story of the Greatest Soul Singer in the World.”

“Barbara and I flew to Chicago,” Womack said. “We checked into the Roberts  Motel and I called Charlie. I told him ‘I’m here. We’re in 2112. In the motel  room, Barbara busied herself loading bullets into a pistol. Barbara had a mean  streak in her.”

When Charles arrived with his brothers David and L.C., he pistol whipped  Bobby and beat him to the point that his teeth went through his lips, rendering  him unconscious.

“I opened the door and Charlie punched me. He beat me so bad my whole head  swelled up like a melon…he even broke my jaw,” Bobby Womack revealed.

Barbara attempted to fire the gun at Charlie, but Bobby Womack had already  taken the bullets out of the pistol, just before Charles and the rest of Sam’s  brothers arrived.

Charles Cooke was hit with a number of charges, including assault.

He was released on $1,000 bail, but since Bobby Womack refused to prosecute  Charles, the charges were eventually dropped.

For all of their troubles and tribulations, Bobby Womack’s marriage to  Barbara Cooke ended in 1970.

According to Bobby, he was also having sex with Sam Cooke’s teenaged daughter  Linda, which was too much for Barbara to take.

Bobby Womack and Barbara Cooke Womack eventually divorced in 1970.

Sam Cooke’s daughter Linda went on to marry Bobby Womack’s brother Cecil  Womack.

Linda and Cecil eventually had seven children together and moved to Africa,  where they changed their name to the Zekkarriyas

Cecil Womack passed away on February 1, 2013 in South Africa.

 

 

 

 

Legends Circle: RIP SCOT LA ROCK

1255213_499159536834188_687239859_n

Scott La Rock: 27th Anniversary

 

33z7nux

Released in early 1987 (soon after Scott’s longtime girlfriend Deatema Brown gave birth to a child, Scott Sterling Jr.), Criminal Minded met with instant acclaim and sold roughly 300,000 copies in its first year of release. (Unfortunately, Rock Candy turned out to be less than the best business partners. Limited distribution and reportedly shady accounting practices have left the album’s true sales figures a mystery, and Scott and KRS never saw the amount of money they deserved.)

The record got the interest, though, of Warner Brothers A&R Benny Medina (who’d go on to manage Will Smith, P. Diddy and Jennifer Lopez among others). In August, Medina flew Scott and KRS out to LA and offered them $275,000 to sign to the major.

Kris and Scott returned to New York amped, ready to announce their power move later that week at Madison Square Garden, where they were scheduled to perform alongside Public Enemy and LL Cool J as part of the Dope Jam Tour. They even began pre-production of tracks like “My Philosophy,” “Stop the Violence” and “I’m Still #1” for an album that would become By All Means Necessary.

That Tuesday night, 16 year-old crewmember D Nice was caught in the Highbridge neighborhood in the Bronx fooling around with someone else’s girl. The angry boyfriend pulled a gun on D, and, with the help of some friends, roughed him up pretty good.

The following afternoon, Scott, Kris, Just Ice, their manager Scotty Morris and bodyguard, Darrel (a.k.a. “The Original Robocop”) were breaking bread at McDonalds on the corner of Broadway and 72nd Street. They had just finalized a deal for BDP to produce Just Ice’s Cool and Deadly album.

“I suggested to Kris that we go get some weed and celebrate in Brooklyn,” Just Ice remembers. “Scott never smoked like that, so he was like, ‘Nah, I’m not fuckin’ with y’all, you’re just gonna get high.’”

As the meal came to a close, Scott got a call on his antique-school, $2-a-minute cell phone. It was D-Nice, explaining his predicament. A father figure to D, Scott didn’t hesitate in offering to handle the situation.

“You can’t have someone doing that to the youngest member of Boogie Down Productions,” says Chris Lighty flatly. “That just don’t make no sense.”

Scott called Lighty and the Violators for muscle. The crews met at a rendezvous point in the South Bronx. Scott, Darrel and Scotty Morris drove to Highbridge in a red, drop-top jeep. D-Nice and the Violators rolled in a second car just behind them.

It was mid-evening by the time the two cars reached University Avenue, between 165th and 166th Street. Though D-Nice’s assailant was not to be found, his crew was hanging out on the block. Darrel jumped out of the jeep and grabbed up the first two kids he could reach, smacking them in the mouth. Playing good cop, Scott came over and calmed things down.

“It seemed like it was mellow,” says Lighty. “Well, as mellow as some kids that just got smacked up can be. Then [Scott and Darrel] were walking back to the car, and gunfire starts—from the ground level, and it seemed like from a couple of levels up too.”

The Violators leapt out of their car to return fire, giving Scott and Darrel the cover to reach the Jeep. Moments later, two .22 caliber bullets ripped through the Jeep’s ragtop. Sitting in the back seat, Scott was hit once in the neck and once behind the ear.

Scotty Morris and Darrel started the car immediately, but Highbridge’s narrow streets and the chaos of the incident made getting off the block nearly impossible. (“It kinda jams up the block when people are shooting at you,” says Lighty.) Finally, after winding their way through several back streets, they made it to Lincoln Memorial Hospital and carried Scott into the emergency room. He was admitted at 11:15 p.m., bleeding profusely and speaking incoherently.

Scott La Rock:The After Math

 

999188_200169643492706_1051098827_nScott “La Rock” Sterling (March 2, 1962 – August 27, 1987) was the original DJ of the hip hop group Boogie Down Productions.

Born March 2, 1962, in, Bronx, New York City, New York, Sterling was raised by his mother, Carolyn Morant, a career municipal employee. (His parents split when he was four years old.) As a youngster, he moved from Queens to the Morisania section of the Bronx, and then to Morris Heights.

Scott excelled in both academics and sports at Our Savior Lutheran High School, graduating in 1980 and heading off to Castleton State College in Vermont. He earned a varsity letter in basketball there. As it became clear that he would not become a professional basketball player, Sterling became more and more focused on music. At Castleton State, he used to DJ at Dugan’s Bar on Friday nights with Lee Smith. He helped introduce the entire campus to music from New York City.

Sterling graduated in 1984 and returned to New York City in hopes of finding work and making in-roads to the music industry. Through a connection of his mother’s, Scott landed a job as a social worker at Franklin Armory Men’s Shelter on 166th St in the Bronx. At night, though, he spun records at the hip hop hot spot, the Broadway Repertoire Theatre.

During his time as a social worker, Sterling met rapper KRS-One in 1986 at Franklin Men’s Shelter where KRS resided. The pair formed Boogie Down Productions with DJ Derrick “D-Nice” Jones, a cousin of the shelter’s security guard. The group’s 1987 debut album, Criminal Minded, is considered a classic of hip-hop.

Sterling met a violent death in 1987. His friend and BDP associate D-Nice had been assaulted by a couple of young men because D-Nice had been dating one of their ex-girlfriends. D-Nice asked Sterling to try to help defuse the situation. Later that day, Sterling, Scotty “Manager Moe” Morris, DJ McBooo, D-Nice and BDP Bodyguard Darrell, all riding in a red Jeep CJ-7 with a white fiberglass top on it, drove to the High bridge Homes Projects building on Morris Avenue in the South Bronx where the offending parties lived. Sterling’s intention may have been to try to defuse the situation, but plenty of physical support arrived with him. As they were leaving, bullets ripped through the side and top of the Jeep. Sterling was hit in the neck.

Critically wounded, he was driven in the Jeep to Lincoln Hospital, which was less than a mile away. He was conscious and talking to the doctors as he was wheeled into the emergency room. Sterling then stated to the doctor that he was feeling cold and tired. At first it was thought that his injuries were not life-threatening, and his friends last saw him being wheeled away into surgery. They couldn’t go into the emergency room with him, so they went to the diner around the corner on Grand Concourse and East 149th Street to wait while he was treated. However, Sterling died in the operating room within one hour of being shot.

Two men were arrested and charged with Sterling’s murder but were acquitted at the trial.

KRS-One continued Boogie Down Productions despite the loss, crediting subsequent releases as being overseen by Scott La Rock. Scott La Rock’s death played a role in fueling the Stop the Violence Movement.

Sterling had one offspring. His son, Scott Sterling Jr., was an infant when Sterling died.

Robert Johnson:King Of Blues

robertjohnson_stamp_0On this day in 1938  blues man Robert Johnson was allegedly poisoned by the jealous husband of a woman he was flirting with. Legend has it Johnson wanted to be the greatest guitar player so he sold his soul to the devil.

Johnson’s style of blues was very influential in the development of r&b and rock&roll. Dust My Broom, Sweet Home Chicago, Love In Vain & Crossroad Blues are some of his most well known tunes and have been covered by hundreds of musicians.

Elvis Presley:January 8, 1935 – August 16, 1977

elvis-presley1977, Elvis Presley was found dead lying on the floor in his bathroom by his girlfriend Ginger Alden, he had been seated on the toilet reading ‘The Scientific Search For Jesus’. He died of heart failure at the age of 42. His first record for RCA, ‘Heartbreak Hotel’, was also his first US No.1. He starred in 31 films. Elvis holds the record for the most entries on the US Hot 100 chart with 154. Elvis became the first rock ‘n’ roll artist to be honoured by the US Postal Service with a stamp.

Richard Millsap:Gone But Not Forgotten….

1376499976921When Richard Millsap opened Crossfit Mosaic gym in a Winter Garden warehouse district last spring, he wanted it to be a place where anyone could feel welcome and no one would ever be turned away — even if they couldn’t pay.

Although officials have not yet released the name of the man gunned down while leading a class of eight people Monday evening, the tight-knit group that worked out in “the box” say it was 33-year-old Millsap.

According to Winter Garden Police Department spokesman Lt. Scott Allen, a man wearing sunglasses and a hat walked into the gym at about 6:45 p.m. Monday and opened fire.

Renaut van der Riet, lead pastor of Mosaic Church, which Millsap attended, spent most of the day at the gym and with Millsap’s wife, Karen, and two young children, ages 2 and 7.

The family has been through “waves of every emotion you can imagine,” the pastor said.

“There is a family left in the wake of devastation because of this insanity,” van der Riet added. “It’s so unfortunate to watch it unfold. There is a wife at home with two kids that has to rethink her entire life because of a single moment.”

On Tuesday afternoon, friends and others left flowers and notes in a makeshift memorial outside the gym.

Millsap’s friend Michael Pritzkau was not working out when the shooting happened, but he joined more than two dozen others at the gym late Monday to mourn and express condolences as police with flashlights collected statements and canvassed the area for clues.

“It was devastating,” said Pritzkau, of Winter Garden. “Rich was a big inspiration. He got people going on the right path. A lot of people listened to him and looked up to him.”

Police say they cannot release the victim’s name until the have a positive identification from the Orange-Osceola Medical Examiner’s Office. That had not happened as of late Tuesday.

Allen said there seems to be no doubt that the victim was the intended target. No one else was injured in the shooting. One class participant tried to chase the gunman, but the suspect got away, Allen said.

Authorities weren’t able to provide the suspected shooter’s name or say if any of the witnesses recognized the man. He escaped in a getaway car driven by a second suspect, who police are searching for as well.

Police have not released a description of the vehicle.

Crossfit Mosaic gym is in the 900 block of Carter Road near State Road 429 and West Colonial Drive. It has been open since March 16, according to the gym’s website.

From Florida to California, messages of anguish poured in on the Facebook page for the Millsap’s gym as news of the deadly shooting spread across the national crossfit community.

Lena Baker: The Real Story

Lena_Baker

Lena Baker is the only woman to have been executed in the state of Georgia during the 20th Century. She was pardoned 60 years after her execution in 2005 by the state, who called the failure of the all white male jury to grant her clemency “a grievous error.” Baker was executed for shooting her employer in self-defense, who had evidently imprisoned her and was threatening her with death at the time of his killing. She shot him with the gun he had been attacking her with in a desperate act to save her life — hardly a murder.

This website content was created with the help of Ultimate Tinymce!