Archives for : POLITICS

September 9, 1996: The Aftermath

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September 9, 1996: 8PM: “Metro Police and about 20 friends and fans of 2pac are in an altercation over what police call a “missunderstanding”. Tensions are calmed with help from a female friend of Shakur’s and four men originally handcuffed during the scuffle are released. No one was arrested. Police have been patrolling outside the hospital out of concern for retaliation after the shooting.” Source: Las Vegas Sun

Columbus Short vs. TMZ

 

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Actor Columbus short took to instagram to defend Ray Rice’s actions and privacy, his dislike for TMZ, and how they exploited him and his situation with Janey Palmer, then he erased his honest, raw, and truthful comments and replace them with a rebuttal to please his fans and audience. what happened to keeping it real?…..

Josie Harris:Women Scorne

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September 8, 1996: The Morning After

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September 8, 1996: 11AM: Suge Knight is released from the University Medical Center. 6:20PM: 2pac undergoes a second operation at UMC to repair damage from bullet wounds. Source: Las Vegas Sun, Cathy Scott.

Marilyn Monroe (June 1, 1926 – August 5, 1962)

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On this date in 1962, Hollywood star Marilyn Monroe was found dead at the age of 36yrs old.

New York, August 5

Marilyn Monroe was found dead in bed this morning in her home in Hollywood, only a physical mile or two, but a social universe, away from the place where she was born 36 years ago as Norma Jean Baker. She died with a row of medicines and an empty bottle of barbiturates at her elbow.

These stony sentences, which read like the epitaph of a Raymond Chandler victim, will confirm for too many millions of movie fans the usual melodrama of a humble girl, cursed by physical beauty, to be dazed and doomed by the fame that was too much for her. For Americans, the last chapter was written on the weekend that a respectable national picture magazine printed for the delectation of her troubled fans a confessional piece called “Marilyn Monroe pours out her soul.”

The plot of her early life is as seedy as anything in the pulp magazines, and to go into the details now would be as tasteless as prying into the clinical file of any other pretty woman whose beauty has crumbled overnight. It is enough, for summoning the necessary compassion, to recall her miserable parents, her being shuttled like a nuisance from foster home to orphanage, the subsequent knockabout years in a war factory, her short independence as a sailor’s wife, the unsuspected first rung of the ladder provided by a posing job for a nude calendar.

She talked easily about all this, when people had the gall to ask her, not as someone reconciled to a wretched childhood but as a wide-eyed outsider, an innocent as foreign to the subject under discussion as Chaplin is when he stands off and analyses the appeal of ” The Little Man.”

Then she wiggled briefly past the lecherous gaze of Louis Calhern in John Huston’s ” Asphalt Jungle,” and his appraising whinny echoed round the globe. Within two years she was the enthroned sexpot of the Western world. She completed the first phase of the American dream by marrying the immortal Joe Di Maggio, the loping hero of the New York Yankees; and the second phase by marrying Arthur Miller and so redeeming his suspect Americanism at the moment it was in question before a House committee.

To say that Marilyn Monroe was a charming, shrewd, and pathetic woman of a tragic integrity will sound as preposterous to the outsider as William Empson’s Freudian analysis of Alice in Wonderland. It is nevertheless true. We restrict the word “integrity” to people, either simple or complex, who have a strong sense of righteousness or, if they are public men, of self-righteousness. Yet it surely means no more than what it says: wholeness, being free to be spontaneous, without reck of consistency or moral appearances. It can be true of forlorn and bewildered people as of the disciplined and the solemn.

In this sense, Marilyn Monroe was all of a piece. She was confused, pathologically shy, a straw on the ocean of her compulsions (to pout, to crackwise, to love a stranger, to be six hours late or lock herself in a room). She was a sweet and humorous person increasingly terrified by the huge stereotype of herself she saw plastered all around her. The exploitation of this pneumatic, mocking, liquid-lipped goddess gave the world a simple picture of the Lorelei. She was about as much of a Lorelei as Bridget, the housemaid.

This orphan of the rootless City of the Angels at last could feel no other identity than the one she saw in the mirror: a baffled, honest girl forever haunted by the nightmare of herself, 60 feet tall and naked before a howling mob. She could never learn to acquire the lacquered shell of the prima donna or the armour of sophistication. So in the end she sought the ultimate oblivion, of which her chronic latecomings and desperate retreats to her room were token suicides.

Yandy & Co: Baby On Board?

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Allegedly Mandeecee’s of Love and Hip Hop New York has another child on the way, but it’s not with his current girl Yandy Smith!

Vstiviano:Secret Love Child?

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Eric Garner:Death By A Coward

 

 

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NY Medical Examiner has ruled the death of Staten Island-resident Eric Garner A Homicide.

The Supremes:Throwback Thursday!

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In 1967, at The Flamingo Hotel, Las Vegas. Florence was sent home during this gig and Cindy Birdsong, who had been secretly rehearsing with Diana & Mary, stepped in. Florence would never return to the stage as a Supreme.

Three years later the group would record their final performance on January 14, 1970 at The Frontier Hotel. “Farewell,” a double-lp, is the rare Motown live album that is great from start to finish. Listening to it, it’s hard to believe they were barely speaking to each other at this point.

Hall & Oates: Rock and Roll Hall Of Fame

 

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I’m nearly in tears at the Joy and fulfillment of seeing one of my all time favorite duos inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame! These gentlemen music is the soundtrack of my Childhood, so many valuable, precious, and loving memories that I cherish til this day.

 

Two beautiful and talented artist who songs made the whole world sang! I never thought I would see the day that they would be in The Rock and Roll Hall Of Fame, 40yrs Too late! But right on time! What’s you’re favorite Hall and Oats song?

Rick James: Solid Gold

 

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Rick James receiving his first gold album and single with Skip Miller, and  Barney Ales.

Rick James: Wonderful

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Wonderful was released on June 13, 1988. Share your playlist in the comments from the album for your chance to win a copy of “Glow: The Autobiography of Rick James” when it is released in July

Medgar Evers (July 2, 1925 – June 12, 1963)

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In the early morning of June 12, 1963, just hours after President John F. Kennedy’s speech on national television in support of civil rights, Medgar Evers pulled into his driveway after returning from a meeting with NAACP lawyers. Emerging from his car and carrying NAACP T-shirts that read “Jim Crow Must Go,” Evers was struck in the back with a bullet fired from an Enfield 1917 rifle; the bullet ripped through his heart. He staggered 9 meters (30 feet) before collapsing. He was taken to the local hospital in Jackson where he was initially refused entry because of his color, until it was explained who he was; he died in the hospital 50 minutes later.

On June 21, 1963, Byron De La Beckwith, a fertilizer salesman and member of the White Citizens’ Council (and later of the Ku Klux Klan), was arrested for Evers’ murder.

District Attorney and future governor Bill Waller prosecuted De La Beckwith. Juries composed solely of white men twice that year deadlocked on De La Beckwith’s guilt.

In 1994, 30 years after the two previous trials had failed to reach a verdict, De La Beckwith was brought to trial based on new evidence. Bobby DeLaughter was the prosecutor. During the trial, the body of Evers was exhumed from his grave for an autopsy. De La Beckwith was convicted of murder on February 5, 1994, after having lived as a free man for much of the three decades following the killing (he was imprisoned from 1977 to 1980 for conspiring to murder A. I. Botnick). De La Beckwith appealed unsuccessfully, and died at age 80 in prison in January 2001.

 

Badmedina:Birkin Babe!

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David Ruffin (January 18,1941-June 1,1991)

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David Ruffin (January 18,1941-June 1,1991) Gone But never forgotten.

 

 

 

 

Stevie Wonder: This Day In Music

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This day in music Stevie Wonder released his first album, “The 12 Year Old Genius.” It would become Motown’s first #1  in 1963!

Billy Idol:”Dancing With Myself,”

 

 

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Billy will release his self-written memoir, “Dancing With Myself,” on October 7th 2014 The book is bold, searingly candid, and written by Idol himself in his inimitable voice.

Pre-order the book here: http://smarturl.it/dancingwithmyself

Stay tuned for news on Billy’s return to the studio and continued touring in coming weeks!

Maya Angelou (April 4, 1928- May 28, 2014)

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Poet Maya Angelou dies at age 86Maya Angelou, a renowned poet, novelist and actress whose work defied description under a simple label, has died, her literary agent, Helen Brann, said Wednesday.
She died at her home in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, Brann said.

A professor, singer and dancer, Angelou’s work spans several professions. In 2011, President Barack Obama awarded her with the Medal of Freedom, the country’s highest civilian honor.
She spent her early years studying dance and drama in San Francisco, but dropped out at age 14, instead becoming the city’s first African-American female cable car conductor.
Angelou later returned to high school to finish her diploma and gave birth a few weeks after graduation. While the 17-year-old single mother waited tables to support her son, she acquired a passion for music and dance, and toured Europe in
the mid-1950s in the opera production “Porgy and Bess.” In 1957, she recorded her first album, “Calypso Lady.” In 1958, Angelou become a part of the Harlem Writers Guild in New York and also played a queen in “The Blacks,” an off-Broadway production by French dramatist Jean Genet.
Affectionately referred to as Dr. Angelou, the professor never went to college. She has more than 30 honorary degrees and taught American studies for years at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem.
“I created myself,” she has said. “I have taught myself so much.”
Angelou was born April 4, 1928, in St. Louis, Missouri. She grew up between St. Louis and the then-racially-segregated town of Stamps, Arkansas.
The famous poet got into writing after a childhood tragedy that stunned her into silence for years. When she was 7, her mother’s boyfriend raped her. He was later beaten to death by a mob after she testified against him.
“My 7-and-a-half-year-old logic deduced that my voice had killed him, so I stopped speaking for almost six years,” she said. From the silence, a louder voice was born.
Her list of friends is as impressive as her illustrious career. Talk show queen Oprah Winfrey referred to her as “sister friend.” She counted Martin Luther King Jr., with whom she worked during the Civil Rights movement, among her friends. King was assassinated on her birthday.
Angelou spoke at least six languages, and worked at one time as a newspaper editor in Egypt and Ghana. During that period, she wrote “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings,” launching the first in a series of autobiographical books.
“I want to write so well that a person is 30 or 40 pages in a book of mine … before she realizes she’s reading,” Angelou said.
She was also one of the first black women film directors. Her work on Broadway has been nominated for Tony Awards.
Before making it big, the 6-foot-tall wordsmith also worked as a cook and sang with a traveling road show. “Look where we’ve all come from … coming out of darkness, moving toward the light,” she once said. “It is a long journey, but a sweet one, bittersweet.”

Charlayne Hunter Gault:Pioneer Of Education

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Charlayne Hunter was born in South Carolina in 1942. Due to her father’s career in the military, her family moved around a lot. However, she and her younger brothers eventually settled in Atlanta, where they were primarily raised by her mother and maternal grandmother. She credits her grandmother for inspiring her early interest in reading and the newspaper.

In 1959, she applied to the University of Georgia, but was denied admittance, so she attended Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan. However, every semester she would submit her application the University of Georgia with the help of the NAACP’s Legal Defense and Education Fund.

In early 1961, Judge William Bootle ruled that Hunter “qualified for… immediate enrollment at the University of Georgia”. Along with Hamilton Holmes, Hunter was one of the two first African-American students to enroll at the University of Georgia. Hunter was often the object of much hostility and aggression. However in 1963, she graduated and married fellow student Walter Stovall, a white man. They had a daughter, Susan, but divorced nine years later.

She would later go on to become an award-winning broadcast journalist, working in both broadcast and print journalism. Hunter worked for such esteemed journalism outlets as the New Yorker, New York Times, NPR, and CNN. Her work garnered her two Emmy awards as well as two Peabody awards. She currently lives in South Africa with her husband, Robert Gault. She has two children: Susan from her first marriage and Chuma from her second.

(Sources: Wikipedia and New Georgia Encyclopedia)


Michael Jackson:Man In The Mirror

 

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Last night Billboard awards there was no African American Males singers performing onstage, with the exception of The Late Great Michael Jackson, whom appeared via Hologram and seems to water down, and fully perished his already, tainted legacy. If Mr. Dick Clark was alive the Billboard awards would be totally different, Clark fought for decades  for Black performers to perform on The American Music awards and the Billboard awards, especially Black males, why after his death, the practice stopped?

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