Archives for : RAP LEGENDS

September 8, 1996: The Morning After

10685380_652198684879005_4565104176847586788_n

 

September 8, 1996: 11AM: Suge Knight is released from the University Medical Center. 6:20PM: 2pac undergoes a second operation at UMC to repair damage from bullet wounds. Source: Las Vegas Sun, Cathy Scott.

Rap Revolution: West Coast Edition

10401865_10152570357351265_8775725395974841673_n

All Eyez on Me:Diamond

imagesHZABBDAC

 

The Late great Rapper Tupac Shakur’s double album, All Eyez on Me, has been certified as “Diamond” status by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), representing more than 10 million copies sold.

Raising Hell: 28th Anniversary

10374935_638913892854054_3613394656244013272_n

Raising Hell is the third album by Rap legends Run Dmc released May 16, 1986.

Rodney “Skip” Bryce:Joy & Pain

rob_base_2

Rodney “Skip” Bryce aka Dj EZ Rock Hip-hop Royalty.

 

Nas & Lauren Hill: 20th Anniversary

1979865_738754932834455_2976892087686891384_n

Legendary Rapper/ Actress Lauren Hill joins Rapper Nas at Coachella yesterday to perform there Hip Hop Classic, if I ruled the world.

Eminem: “Detroit vs. Everybody”

 

10172676_10152266947437964_2975807666513946010_n

Eminem recruits Spike Lee for his ‘Headlights’ video in Detroit.

Nas: Illmatic 20th Anniversary!

1148771_10153945825935076_286118551_n

 

Nas celebrates the 20th anniversary of Illmatic in Washington D.C.

http://goo.gl/4TTY5U

TRINA & EVE On RuPaul’s Drag Race

 

1794744_710906822293846_1062091340_n

NEW: Female Rappers TRINA & EVE On RuPaul’s Drag Race!!!! 9/8c on Logo TV MONDAY!

1966931_10152301043914381_367321078_n

Onyx:”Bacdafucup”

1011057_10152126402002851_567830590_n

 

On this day in 1993, Onyx released their debut studio album, “Bacdafucup”, to critical and commercial success. Their single “Slam” hit #4 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. ‪#‎DefJam30‬

Slick Rick:From Nyc To Miami!

1979664_10151916781846286_474707308_n

Nate Dogg: (August 19, 1941- March 14, 2011)

Nate Dogg

Rest in Paradise  Nathaniel Dwayne Hale aka ” Nate Dogg”Today marks three years since his untimely and sudden death, his unique voice will never be replaced in Rap History.

Tupac: Me Against The World

1001545_664601923617866_1549882654_n

‘Me Against the World’ the third studio album by Tupac Shakur. Released March 14, 1995. ‘Me Against the World’ the third studio album by Tupac Shakur. Released March 14, 1995.

John Singleton: ALL EYEZ ON ME

1654128_10152222866102855_1053158522_n

John Singleton signs on to direct the Tupac Shakur biopic

Lil Kim: Mother Queen B!

10090_10151993967968983_651186340_n

Lil Kim is expecting her first child in the summer! cognates!

Damion ” World” Hardy: American Gangster Part I

LIL KIM

We all know that when the feds get a new case they construct it based on the lies, half-truths and insinuations perpetrated by rats, cooperators and snitches. It doesn’t matter if what the witnesses are saying out of their mouths is true or not. The feds just roll with it. There is no investigation or nothing substantial going on. The U.S. Attorneys just go by what their snitches are saying. The cooperator’s words become the universal truth that prosecutors base their case off of.  And in reality, the snitches are just saying whatever it is they think the feds want to hear, so they can get out of whatever jam they have managed to get themselves into. Whatever happened to the saying, if you are willing to do the crime be willing to do the time?

Nowadays these so-called hustlers, players and gangsters get themselves into a messy situation where they are facing the prospect of spending decades of their lives behind bars, due to the governments War on Drugs, the mandatory minimums and sentencing guidelines, and it seems they will say just about anything to get out of it. They’ll rat on their friends, their family and in some cases, even their moms. Basically they will tell the feds whatever it is they want to hear. There is no honor in the streets and when dudes flip they say, “Charge it to the game.”

These big multi-layered RICO act cases that the U.S. Attorneys crank out have become more a matter of the feds getting their snitches stories to fit the indictments they have concocted, and less a practice of justice or  looking for the truth. There have been numerous cases we have reported on and exposed here in this magazine that show how the U.S. government works. They are using statutes made to convict Mafia families and Colombian drug lords on inner-city drug crews, who are usually more unorganized chaos than organized crime. The feds have a tendency to identify the ultimate target of their probe before the investigation into their affairs has even started. If someone’s name is ringing in the street than they are a target. Especially in regards to the feds’ tough on crime policies as they apply to their war on minorities. Because let’s keep it real, black people account for 15 percent of the U.S. population, but 50 percent of the prison population. How can those numbers be justified?

The feds are putting cases on people, but let’s face it they aren’t doing it alone. And the snitches play along, doing whatever it takes to get that time cut. They say one thing in their proffers to get people indicted, but once they get on the stand they change the story up, doing whatever the prosecutor wants them to do so they can to get that 5k1 or Rule 35 sentence reduction motion. Ain’t nobody trying to do that 20 year sentence even for their so-called man. In the streets it’s every man for himself. Because the feds don’t play. Dudes get busted and talk that “Death Before Dishonor” shit, but when it comes down to it if they want to get that time cut you know what they are doing. And it has nothing to do with death before dishonor. The prosecutors are the same way; they don’t care what they have to do to get their convictions. They have no sense of honor and justice or right and wrong. They will literally do whatever it takes. The whole profession of attorneys is a pit of snakes and sharks.

Maxims like “Death Before Dishonor” and “Stop Snitching” don’t exist in the drug game and criminal underworld anymore, except in very rare cases. They are ideals of the past, held up in memory and supposedly cherished, but not honored in the present day. Most dudes in the streets are playing a dirty game. When that indictment comes down its literally every man for himself. It’s like the buffet, whoever is first in line gets the best deal. You heard Rick Ross talking about, “I caught a charge,” but nigga you didn’t catch no charge. The drug game to you is a fantasy, a hip-hop video where you fake it to make it. But this shit isn’t entertainment, this isn’t about fronting and stunting, this shit is real life. Dudes are doing life because these crab-ass busters can’t hold their weight. These dudes are talking about how gangsta they are these days but in truth they are suckers. They think it’s a music video or a video game, like they can walk off the set, change the song or hit the do over or reset button when the feds roll in. But there are no do over’s in life, homie. The drug game and life in the streets is not Grand Theft Auto. The truth and reality of it all is much more serious.

The brothers doing life in the pen know what we’re talking about. They are the ones doing hard time. They have lived the life, talked the talk and walked the walk. They are the real gangsters. The ones the rappers rap about and portray themselves to be. Their lifestyles are what the rappers pretend to flaunt. The reality is not MTV Cribs though. Imagine being locked down since 2005 and you haven’t even blew trial or been found guilty yet. Imagine that the feds consider you so dangerous, so gangster that they have held you in limbo, even though they know their charges won’t stick at trial. You’re probably saying this doesn’t happen in the USA. This can’t happen. It won’t happen. We are the land of the free and the home of the brave, but we are here to tell you it can happen and it does. It’s not about justice it’s about Just-Us and in Amerikkka, the kkk mentality still pervades. Case in point, the Cash Money Brothers, straight outta Do or Die Bedstuy, Brooklyn, New York. The borough that brought us the Notorious B.I.G., Jay-Z, Lil’ Kim, Big Daddy Kane and the part of the city that’s known for producing the most thorough gangsters, thugs and hoodlums to grace the streets of the Big Apple.

Cash Money Brothers was a crew formed in Lafayette Gardens Projects in Brooklyn in the early-90s by brothers Damion “World” Hardy and Myron “Wise” Hardy. With their homeboys and associates they allegedly held it down in L.G. and made a name for themselves across the city as a gangster and respected crew, but as various members including World went to prison on different charges the crew became inactive and remained just a legend on the streets of New York. But when a series of murders in the early 2000s were laid at the crew’s doorstep the feds stepped in.

On July 19, 2005, Roslynn Mauskopf, United States Attorney for the Eastern District of New York announced the filing of federal racketeering and narcotics charges against Damion “World” Hardy and 12 additional leaders, members and associates of the Cash Money Brothers or CMB, what they termed a violent Brooklyn street gang responsible for five murders, widespread crack distribution, the attempted murder of a witness, the kidnapping and attempted robbery of a drug dealer, assault and illegal firearms possession.

The charges and arrests followed an 18 month joint ICE, FBI and NYPD investigation coordinated by the U.S. Attorney’s office as part of an ongoing initiative to eliminate violent street gangs that erode the quality of life in many of the districts neighborhoods. “The arrests announced today strike a devastating blow to a drug gang responsible for spreading fear and violence in one of our communities,” stated U.S. Attorney Mauskopf. “When gangs flood our streets with drugs, assassinate rivals, attempt to murder witnesses and endanger the lives of innocent residents, we will mobilize all resources available, including federal prosecution, through the RICO statute. This case is the latest of several successful joint investigations that demonstrate our commitment to protect public housing from gang violence. We are determined to return control of these communities to their rightful law-abiding residents.”

The government’s investigation revealed that for more than 10 years, CMB members, led by Damion Hardy, controlled narcotics trafficking in the Lafayette Gardens Houses in the Bedford-Stuyvesant section of Brooklyn through violence and intimidation directed against their drug trafficking competitors, innocent civilians and potential witnesses. Hardy, Eric “E-Bay” Moore, Dwayne “Thor” Myers, James “Popsie” Sessoms, Kenwayne “Stro” Jones, Robert “Troub” Footman, Carl “Big Jim” Davis, James “Jimbo” Farrior, Lamont “Sambo” Johnson, Zareh “Puff” Sarkissian, Abubakr Raheem, DJebara “DJ” McMillian and Isheen “Sha” Campbell were charged with conspiring between 1991 and August 2004 to distribute crack cocaine using apartments they controlled in Lafayette Gardens to cook, store and buy the drugs.

“This case is another example of the continuing resolve of the FBI and our partners to reign in gang violence,” FBI agent Mark Mershon said. “The lethal combination of gangs, guns and drugs can terrorize neighborhoods and victimize innocent people. Our purpose fundamentally, is to secure for all New Yorkers the right to be safe and out of harm’s way in their own neighborhoods, whether they live on Park Avenue or in public housing.” World was identified as the founder and leader of CMB with E-Bay, Thor, Popsie and Stro being named as the main members in charge of the crew. The feds also attributed numerous murders to CMB.

Throughout the 1990s the government claims that Ivory “Peanut” Davis was one of CMB’s drug dealing rivals in Lafayette Gardens. On June 12, 1999, Davis’ nephew, Rumel Davis, shot and killed World’s brother Myron “Wise” Hardy during a so called turf dispute while World was locked up in the state. When World got out he investigated the circumstances of his brother’s death and the feds alleged that World and the other members of CMB retaliated by conspiring to murder Peanut and four of his associates. World, E-Bay and Puff were charged with the murder of Darryl “Homicide” Baum on June 10, 2000. This is the same Homicide rapper 50 Cent accused of shooting him nine times earlier that same year in May. 50 Cent also implied in his song Many Men that Hommo was killed in retaliation for shooting him. But like a lot of 50 Cent’s gangsta rap fantasies this tale has yet to be clarified one way or another. So in reality it’s up to the streets to decide.

Homicide was a Brooklyn stick-up kid and gun thug who counted boxer Mike Tyson as a close friend and employer. He was even living at Mike Tyson’s home when he was murdered. The feds concluded that World targeted Homicide because of his association with Peanut. They alleged E-Bay shot Homicide in the back of the head at the corner of Quincy Street and Marcy Avenue and fled in a get-away car driven by Puff. The feds implicated World, E-Bay and Abubakr Raheem in the August 1, 2000 murder of James “JR” Hamilton also. On World’s order E-Bay allegedly shot and killed JR inside a seafood restaurant that Hamilton owned at 102 Sarasota Avenue in Brooklyn. E-Bay than fled in a get-away car driven by Raheem. JR was supposedly killed due to his association with Peanut also.

According to the feds the CMB crew was not finished with their murder spree, more bodies had to drop. At 4:00 a.m. on the morning of August 10, 2000, E-Bay carrying a .40 caliber handgun that belonged to Thor, allegedly shot Peanut twice in the back as he sat in a car parked in front of Club NV, a nightclub on the corner of Spring Street and Hudson Street in Manhattan on World’s orders. Peanut sped away, but lost control of his car and killed an innocent pedestrian. Peanut subsequently died from his gunshot wounds. Both deaths were attributed to World. World’s and CMB’s revenge was complete but the killing continued.

On July 25, 2003, Homicide’s brother, Tyrone “T-Rock” Baum, who the feds alleged World believed was seeking to avenge his brother’s murder, was killed. On World’s order, Thor and Raheem located “T-Rock” by a construction site at Reid Avenue and Hancock Street in Brooklyn where “T-Rock” was shot three times in the head. “These arrests have dismantled a major criminal enterprise that has engaged in murder, kidnapping, extortion and narcotics trafficking. These criminals have threatened our citizens and the well-being of our communities. No more, today, they are off the streets and will be prosecuted for their crimes.” U.S. Attorney Mauskopf said. That is the feds’ line and they are sticking to it but during Raheem’s trial the government’s star witness Edward “Taz” Cooke didn’t testify because the government wouldn’t let him. The other witness Shelby “Moo” Henderson stated that Taz could have been the mastermind behind the murders of JR, Hommo and T-Rock because JR was running numbers and that was a business Taz was involved in, not World. And Hommo and T-Rock allegedly had something to do with Taz’s father getting killed. So Taz had revenge on his mind for Homo and T-Rock. And he wanted to get Brooklyn on lock with the numbers running so he got JR killed and once he got locked up he put the feds on World and got him locked up. Court records also relate that Taz was present at all three murders, not World.

Mary & Dana: Two Queens

1013535_10151908918438996_822673479_n

Jay-z: Cigar Aficiando!

120363-original

Scott La Rock: 27th Anniversary

 

33z7nux

Released in early 1987 (soon after Scott’s longtime girlfriend Deatema Brown gave birth to a child, Scott Sterling Jr.), Criminal Minded met with instant acclaim and sold roughly 300,000 copies in its first year of release. (Unfortunately, Rock Candy turned out to be less than the best business partners. Limited distribution and reportedly shady accounting practices have left the album’s true sales figures a mystery, and Scott and KRS never saw the amount of money they deserved.)

The record got the interest, though, of Warner Brothers A&R Benny Medina (who’d go on to manage Will Smith, P. Diddy and Jennifer Lopez among others). In August, Medina flew Scott and KRS out to LA and offered them $275,000 to sign to the major.

Kris and Scott returned to New York amped, ready to announce their power move later that week at Madison Square Garden, where they were scheduled to perform alongside Public Enemy and LL Cool J as part of the Dope Jam Tour. They even began pre-production of tracks like “My Philosophy,” “Stop the Violence” and “I’m Still #1” for an album that would become By All Means Necessary.

That Tuesday night, 16 year-old crewmember D Nice was caught in the Highbridge neighborhood in the Bronx fooling around with someone else’s girl. The angry boyfriend pulled a gun on D, and, with the help of some friends, roughed him up pretty good.

The following afternoon, Scott, Kris, Just Ice, their manager Scotty Morris and bodyguard, Darrel (a.k.a. “The Original Robocop”) were breaking bread at McDonalds on the corner of Broadway and 72nd Street. They had just finalized a deal for BDP to produce Just Ice’s Cool and Deadly album.

“I suggested to Kris that we go get some weed and celebrate in Brooklyn,” Just Ice remembers. “Scott never smoked like that, so he was like, ‘Nah, I’m not fuckin’ with y’all, you’re just gonna get high.’”

As the meal came to a close, Scott got a call on his antique-school, $2-a-minute cell phone. It was D-Nice, explaining his predicament. A father figure to D, Scott didn’t hesitate in offering to handle the situation.

“You can’t have someone doing that to the youngest member of Boogie Down Productions,” says Chris Lighty flatly. “That just don’t make no sense.”

Scott called Lighty and the Violators for muscle. The crews met at a rendezvous point in the South Bronx. Scott, Darrel and Scotty Morris drove to Highbridge in a red, drop-top jeep. D-Nice and the Violators rolled in a second car just behind them.

It was mid-evening by the time the two cars reached University Avenue, between 165th and 166th Street. Though D-Nice’s assailant was not to be found, his crew was hanging out on the block. Darrel jumped out of the jeep and grabbed up the first two kids he could reach, smacking them in the mouth. Playing good cop, Scott came over and calmed things down.

“It seemed like it was mellow,” says Lighty. “Well, as mellow as some kids that just got smacked up can be. Then [Scott and Darrel] were walking back to the car, and gunfire starts—from the ground level, and it seemed like from a couple of levels up too.”

The Violators leapt out of their car to return fire, giving Scott and Darrel the cover to reach the Jeep. Moments later, two .22 caliber bullets ripped through the Jeep’s ragtop. Sitting in the back seat, Scott was hit once in the neck and once behind the ear.

Scotty Morris and Darrel started the car immediately, but Highbridge’s narrow streets and the chaos of the incident made getting off the block nearly impossible. (“It kinda jams up the block when people are shooting at you,” says Lighty.) Finally, after winding their way through several back streets, they made it to Lincoln Memorial Hospital and carried Scott into the emergency room. He was admitted at 11:15 p.m., bleeding profusely and speaking incoherently.

Scott La Rock:The After Math

 

999188_200169643492706_1051098827_nScott “La Rock” Sterling (March 2, 1962 – August 27, 1987) was the original DJ of the hip hop group Boogie Down Productions.

Born March 2, 1962, in, Bronx, New York City, New York, Sterling was raised by his mother, Carolyn Morant, a career municipal employee. (His parents split when he was four years old.) As a youngster, he moved from Queens to the Morisania section of the Bronx, and then to Morris Heights.

Scott excelled in both academics and sports at Our Savior Lutheran High School, graduating in 1980 and heading off to Castleton State College in Vermont. He earned a varsity letter in basketball there. As it became clear that he would not become a professional basketball player, Sterling became more and more focused on music. At Castleton State, he used to DJ at Dugan’s Bar on Friday nights with Lee Smith. He helped introduce the entire campus to music from New York City.

Sterling graduated in 1984 and returned to New York City in hopes of finding work and making in-roads to the music industry. Through a connection of his mother’s, Scott landed a job as a social worker at Franklin Armory Men’s Shelter on 166th St in the Bronx. At night, though, he spun records at the hip hop hot spot, the Broadway Repertoire Theatre.

During his time as a social worker, Sterling met rapper KRS-One in 1986 at Franklin Men’s Shelter where KRS resided. The pair formed Boogie Down Productions with DJ Derrick “D-Nice” Jones, a cousin of the shelter’s security guard. The group’s 1987 debut album, Criminal Minded, is considered a classic of hip-hop.

Sterling met a violent death in 1987. His friend and BDP associate D-Nice had been assaulted by a couple of young men because D-Nice had been dating one of their ex-girlfriends. D-Nice asked Sterling to try to help defuse the situation. Later that day, Sterling, Scotty “Manager Moe” Morris, DJ McBooo, D-Nice and BDP Bodyguard Darrell, all riding in a red Jeep CJ-7 with a white fiberglass top on it, drove to the High bridge Homes Projects building on Morris Avenue in the South Bronx where the offending parties lived. Sterling’s intention may have been to try to defuse the situation, but plenty of physical support arrived with him. As they were leaving, bullets ripped through the side and top of the Jeep. Sterling was hit in the neck.

Critically wounded, he was driven in the Jeep to Lincoln Hospital, which was less than a mile away. He was conscious and talking to the doctors as he was wheeled into the emergency room. Sterling then stated to the doctor that he was feeling cold and tired. At first it was thought that his injuries were not life-threatening, and his friends last saw him being wheeled away into surgery. They couldn’t go into the emergency room with him, so they went to the diner around the corner on Grand Concourse and East 149th Street to wait while he was treated. However, Sterling died in the operating room within one hour of being shot.

Two men were arrested and charged with Sterling’s murder but were acquitted at the trial.

KRS-One continued Boogie Down Productions despite the loss, crediting subsequent releases as being overseen by Scott La Rock. Scott La Rock’s death played a role in fueling the Stop the Violence Movement.

Sterling had one offspring. His son, Scott Sterling Jr., was an infant when Sterling died.

This website content was created with the help of Ultimate Tinymce!