Archives for : ROCK AND ROLL

The Kings Of Rock & Roll!

 

 

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Willie Dixon, Little Richard, Bo Diddley, Chuck Berry in1986 (from the documentary “Hail! Hail! Rock ‘n’ Roll”).

Billy Idol:”Dancing With Myself,”

 

 

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Billy will release his self-written memoir, “Dancing With Myself,” on October 7th 2014 The book is bold, searingly candid, and written by Idol himself in his inimitable voice.

Pre-order the book here: http://smarturl.it/dancingwithmyself

Stay tuned for news on Billy’s return to the studio and continued touring in coming weeks!

Hall & Oates: Rock and Roll Hall Of Fame!

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It may seem strange that a couple of white kids from the suburbs would grow up to be the first Philly performers to go into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame representing the city’s signature soulful sound.

But Daryl Hall and John Oates have been confounding expectations since they met as students at Temple University in 1967.

Beginning with “Sara Smile” in 1975, they wracked up 29 Top 40 hits, becoming the most successful duo in music history.

On Thursday at Barclays Center in Brooklyn, Hall and Oates will be inducted into the hall by Roots drummer, Tonight Show bandleader, and fellow Philadelphian Questlove. The other honorees, in a ceremony that will be shown on HBO on May 31, are Peter Gabriel, KISS, Nirvana, Linda Ronstadt, Cat Stevens, and Springsteen’s yeomen, the E Street Band. (The Boss was installed individually in 1999.)

Hall and Oates are going in on their first ballot. They’ve been eligible since 1997, but, remarkably, have never been nominated until this year. Why the oversight?

“A lot of people wonder why it is so often that artists who have sold a lot are not inducted more quickly,” says Greg Harris, the president and CEO of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. “The number of units sold – that piece doesn’t speak to contributions to the art form as much as artistic merits do.”

But as a Bucks County native, Harris admits he’s pretty pumped. “I think they’re terrific,” he says. “As a music lover and a Delaware Valley guy, it’s always extra exciting when it’s a band you grew up hearing on the radio.”

The two musicians have been hearing that questionable argument – their music can’t be good because it’s too popular – their whole career.

“There was a definite stigma attached to being a band with a No. 1 hit in the Top 40,” says Oates, who turns 65 this week. “It meant you couldn’t be important or deep or hip.

“Now the only way to be hip is to get on the top of the charts, to stand out from the clutter,” he continues. “It’s turned 180 degrees. Now young people look at what we accomplished as supremely hip.”

A new generation of vocal fans has emerged in millennial musicians like Fall Out Boy’s Patrick Stump, Chromeo’s Dave 1, and Death Cab for Cutie’s Ben Gibbard. Rapper Travie McCoy, former front man for Gym Class Heroes, has large tattoos of Daryl and John on the backs of his hands. That’s hard core, man!

Make no mistake: Hall and Oates are proud to enter the hall as POP artists (Products of Philadelphia).

“I owe Philadelphia my career,” says Hall, 67. “It made my music what it sounds like.”

“It’s the heart and soul and core of what we do,” agrees Oates.

 

‘Always’ Philly

They still play about 45 dates a year. Recently, Oates has been doing solo appearances in support of his just released album, Good Road to Follow. Since 2007, Hall has hosted an acclaimed Web series, Live From Daryl’s House, in which he duets with artists as diverse as Grace Potter and Chiddy Bang. He just finished an episode this week with Darius Rucker at his home in Charlotte.

Oates splits his year between Colorado and Nashville. Hall maintains homes in Connecticut and Charleston, S.C.

“It doesn’t matter where we live or record,” says Oates. “We’re always going to represent Philly.”

Both Hall, who grew up Daryl Hohl outside Pottstown, and Oates, who was raised in North Wales, were drawn to the musical magnet of the city. Enrolling in classes at Temple was just their day job.

Hall, who doted on local soul singers like the Delfonics and the Intruders, joined four other students in a vocal doo wop band called the Temptones (originally the Templetones).

After a triumphant amateur night performance at the Uptown Theater on North Broad Street, the Temptones were signed to Arctic Records by Jimmy Bishop, program director and DJ at WDAS. The label’s biggest hit came in 1965 with Barbara Mason’s “Yes, I’m Ready.”

Oates was happily soaking up all the ’60s had to offer. “Between all that R&B radio in the city and going to the Folk Festival, between Jerry Blavat and early underground FM radio on ‘MMR, it was the ultimate fertile ground for absorbing music,” he says.

He played guitar for an R&B band called the Masters that was signed to Clover Records. The label, co-owned by Blavat, later had a breakout with the Soul Survivors’ “Expressway to Your Heart” in 1967.

Both bands were promoting their singles at a record hop at the Adelphi Ballroom in West Philadelphia when a riot broke out. Trying to escape, Hall and Oates ended up in the same elevator and struck up a conversation.

The Masters broke up shortly after and Oates was drafted to play guitar for the Temptones. That’s when Kenny Gamble, the architect of the sound of Philadelphia, met them. “They were working with us at Frank Virtue’s studio at Broad and Columbia [now Cecil B. Moore Avenue] and they were fantastic,” he says by e-mail.

Gamble and longtime partner Leon Huff were inducted into the hall in 2008 as non-performers. The O’Jays, who were on Gamble and Huff’s label, Philadelphia International and were inducted three years earlier, were originally from Ohio.

 

‘LIttle by little’

It rankles Hall that the City of Brotherly Love is so neglected. “Considering the overwhelming impact Philadelphia has had on the music world, it’s really underrepresented in the hall,” he says. “I find that disturbing.”

Back to that fateful first meeting in the elevator: You would think when two men who were destined to form one of the most prolific partnerships in modern music met, a choir might descend from the rafters.

Not so much. “There was no lightning,” says Hall, chuckling. “We both liked the same kinds of music and we both came from the suburbs, so we each needed a roommate to share an apartment in the city. It was only over the years that our friendship turned into trying to make music together.”

“Little by little, we tried some things,” recalls Oates. “The stuff we did in the early days didn’t sound very good. We couldn’t get our voices to blend.”

In fact, even after they signed to Atlantic Records, it took them four albums to really find their groove.

“That doesn’t happen anymore. No label would give us three records to make mistakes and find ourselves,” says Oates. “We wouldn’t be having this conversation.”

He believes it’s the tunes as much as the talent that has carried them to this lofty point.

“Our songs have been able to sustain, to keep being able to be played on the radio,” says Oates. “Some, luckily for us, sound timeless. That’s why people still come to see us. That’s why in my estimation we’re getting in the Hall of Fame.”

Well, that and a dose of Philly street flavor.

 David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer


Michael Jackson: Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

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Today in 2001, Michael Jackson was inducted into the Rock n’ Roll Hall of Fame as a solo artist.

Hank Ballard:(November 18th, 1927-March 2nd 2003)

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Hank Ballard (November 18, 1927 – March 2, 2003),born John Henry Kendricks, was a rhythm and blues singer and songwriter, the lead vocalist of Hank Ballard and The Midnighters and one of the first rock ‘n’ roll artists to emerge in the early 1950s. He played an integral part in the development of the genre, releasing the hit singles “Work With Me, Annie” and answer songs “Annie Had a Baby” and “Annie’s Aunt Fannie” with his Midnighters. He later wrote and recorded “The Twist” which spread the popularity of the dance and was notably covered by Chubby Checker. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1990.

 

 

Born John Henry Kendricks in Detroit, Michigan, Ballard along with his brother, Dove Ballard, grew up and attended school in Bessemer, Alabama after the death of their father.He lived with his paternal aunt and her husband, and began singing in church. His major vocal inspiration during his formative years was the “Singing Cowboy”, Gene Autry, and in particular, his signature song, “Back in the Saddle Again“.Ballard returned to Detroit in his teens and later worked on the assembly line for Ford.

In 1953, Ballard joined doo-wop group The Royals, which had previously been discovered by Johnny Otis and signed to Federal Records, (a division of King Records), in Cincinnati. Ballard joined Henry Booth, Charles Sutton, Sonny Woods and Alonzo Tucker in the group, replacing previous singer Lawson Smith.

The Royals released “Get It” (1953), an R&B song with possibly sexually oriented lyrics, which some radio stations refused to play, although it still made it to number 6 on the Billboard R&B chart.

The group then changed its name to The Midnighters to avoid confusion with The “5” Royales. In 1954, Ballard wrote a song called “Work with Me, Annie” that was drawn from “Get It”.It became The Midnighters’ first major R&B hit, spending seven weeks at number 1 on the R&B charts and also selling well in mainstream markets, along with the answer songs “Annie Had a Baby” and “Annie’s Aunt Fannie”; all were banned by the FCC from radio air play. Their third major hit was “Sexy Ways”, a song that cemented the band’s reputation as one of the most risqué groups of the time.

After the Midnighters disbanded, Ballard launched a solo career. His 1968 single, “How You Gonna Get Respect (When You Haven’t Cut Your Process Yet)”, was his biggest post-Midnighters hit, peaking at number 15 on the R&B chart. James Brown produced Ballard’s 1969 album You Can’t Keep a Good Man Down. A 1972 single, “From the Love Side”, credited to Hank Ballard and the Midnight Lighters, went to number 43 on the R&B chart. Ballard also appeared on Brown’s 1972 album Get on the Good Foot, in a track (“Recitation By Hank Ballard”) that features Ballard describing Brown and the album.

During the 1960s, Ballard’s cousin, Florence Ballard, was a member of the Detroit girl group The Supremes.

In the mid-1980s, Ballard re-formed The Midnighters and the group performed till 2002.

In 1990, Ballard was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame; the other Midnighters were inducted in 2012.

On March 2, 2003, he died at age 75 of throat cancer in his Los Angeles home.He was buried at Greenwood Cemetery in Atlanta, Georgia.

Ballard was the great uncle of NFL player Christian Ballard.

They had four other R&B chart hits in 1954–55, but no others until 1959, by which time the group was billed as “Hank Ballard and The Midnighters” with their label changed from Federal to King, the parent label. Between 1959 and 1961 they had several more both on the R&B and Pop charts, starting with “Teardrops on Your Letter”, a number 4 R&B hit in 1960 that had as its B-side the Ballard-written song “The Twist“. A few months later, Chubby Checker‘s cover version of the song went to number 1 on the pop charts. It would return to the top of the charts again in 1962–the only song in the rock’n’roll era to reach number 1 in two different years.

Ballard & the Midnighters had several other hit singles through 1961, including the Grammy-nominated “Finger Poppin’ Time” and “Let’s Go, Let’s Go, Let’s Go” which hit number 7 and number 6, respectively, on the Billboard pop charts. They did not reach the charts again after 1962 and dissolved in 1965.

 

 

 

 

 

Dusty Springfield:(April 16th 1939-March 2nd 1999)

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The JACKSONS: Motown Gold!

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The Jacksons attend the NAACP Image Awards, Los Angeles, California, November 19, 1970.

BALLARD AND BIRDSONG: This Magic Moment!

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BALLARD AND BIRDSONG: This Magic Moment! Florence & Cindy 1974 magic mountain
FlorenceandcindyIn the summer of 1975, Mary Wilson worked a little magic and pulled Florence Ballard on stage as a Supreme for one last time! The Supremes (Wilson, Cindy Birdsong, who had replaced Florence in 1967, and Scherrie Payne, who had replaced Jean Terrell, who had replaced Diana Ross) were performing at Magic Mountain, an amusement park located just north of Los Angeles, and Ballard was th…ere visiting.
Florence had fallen on hard times financially, and had struggled with physical and emotional problems since being fired from The Supremes in 1967. 1975 was a particularly rough year, and Wilson, distressed over her old singing partner’s present condition, invited Flo to spend the summer with her family in California.
There are stories of fans seeing Ballard walking backstage and through the crowds looking rather rough and tough for wear, but, to me, these photos suggest otherwise. The visit with Wilson had its up and downs, but for one shining, magical moment, Florence Ballard held supreme with the group she named and helped found for the first time in eight years. And she did it with the nice lady who replaced her in the group, Cindy Birdsong, the Good Supreme!
“Ladies and gentlemen, I have a surprise guest …. Miss Florence Ballard!” Wilson intoned to an audience of over 2,000. The crowd went berserk and rushed the stage with cameras and cries of “Flo, we love you.” Florence was met with a thunderous ovation with love flooding the headlights. She didn’t sing a note!
All she did was beat a tambourine and dance around the stage, but that was good enough! There are varying stories of Ballard having stopped listening to the classic songs that helped to make her famous, and the word is during the classic group hits-medley that night, Ballard excused herself from the arena only to return when it was over.
Apparently, Wilson had no problem coaxing her onstage for the rousing finale, a rendition of the O’Jays hit, Love Train. And in what must have been a glorious moment for everyone, there were tears in the eyes of those who watched the beleagured Ballard come full circle, and take her rightful place right alongside Cindy Birdsong for just one more magical moment.

Florence Ballard:(June 30, 1943 – February 22, 1976)

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1943: Ballard was born in Detroit, Michigan on June 30, 1943, to Lurlee (née Wilson) and Jesse Ballard.
1959: In 1959, Ballard was spotted on her porch by a local talent scout named Milton Jenkins, then manager of the vocal group the Primes, as he sought to find female vocalists to fill spots for a sister group of the Primes.
1966: One night in 1966, prior to opening at the Copacabana supper club, Ballard had come down with a sore throat and asked Ross to sing “People”.
1968: 2002: The Supreme Florence “Flo” Ballard (originally shelved by ABC Records in 1968 under the proposed title, “…You Don’t Have To”)
1970: Despite these successes, Ballard’s solo career suffered and she eventually was dropped from ABC Records in 1970.
1971: In July 1971, Ballard sued Motown for additional royalty payments she believed she was due to receive; Ballard was defeated in court by Motown.
1976: Florence Ballard died on February 22, 1976 in Detroit, United States.

On This Day In R&B Music History: February 21, 1970

The Family Stone

On February 21, 1970 The Number One Record on the R&B Charts was Thank You By Sly & The Family Stone (5 weeks at #1). The Songs we were listening to that week were: Call Me by Aretha Franklin, Gotta Hold On To This Feeling by Jr. Walker & The All-Stars, Up The Ladder To The Roof by The Supremes (pictured), Love Or Let Me Be Lonely by The Friends Of Distinction, You’re The One by Little Sister, It’s A New Day by JaOn February 21, 1970 The Number One Record on the R&B Charts was Thank You By Sly & The Family Stone (5 weeks at #1).

 

The Songs we were listening to that week were: Call Me by Aretha Franklin, Gotta Hold On To This Feeling by Jr. Walker & The All-Stars, Up The Ladder To The Roof by The Supremes (pictured), Love Or Let Me Be Lonely by The Friends Of Distinction, You’re The One by Little Sister, It’s A New Day by James Brown, Love Land by Charles Wright & The Watts 103rd St Rhythm Band, 24 Hours Of Sadness by The Chi-Lites, Love Bones by Johnnie Taylor and Never Had A Dream Come True by Stevie Wondermes Brown, Love Land by Charles Wright & The Watts 103rd St Rhythm Band, 24 Hours Of Sadness by The Chi-Lites, Love Bones by Johnnie Taylor and Never Had A Dream Come True by Stevie Wonder!

Al Green: Let’s Stay Together!

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On This Day In Music: On February 12, 1970 “Let’s Stay Together by Al green went to number one on the US single chart.

Rick Huxley: (August 5th 1940-February 11th 2013)

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Mr. Rick Huxley-The Dave Clark Five (Aug 5th 1940-Feb 11th 2013) Seen here with The Supremes.

Estelle Bennett (July 22nd 1941-Feb 11th 2009)RIP

The RonettesEstelle Bennett July 22nd 1941-Feb 11th 2009 The Fabulous Ronettes

Motown Empire: West Grand Boulevard

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All of these houses were part of the Motown Empire on West Grand Boulevard. R to L
2644/46  Jobete Publishing Company [now the museum entrance] Bought 4/18/1961
2648  Recording studio [Hitsville] at the back of the building on the lower ground floor.  Also residence of Berry and Raynoma in upstairs rooms. Bought 8/2/1959…
2650 Offices of Berry Gordy/Esther Edwards and Ralph Seltzer. This is vacant ground, to the left of Hitsville. It burned to the ground in 1971. Bought 1/23/1962
2652/54  Motown Administration Bought 1/23/1962
2656  Motown Finance (white front) Bought 3/4/1965
2662/64  Motown Sales and Marketing building Bought 7/11/1966
2666/68  Motown Sales and Marketing building Bought 7/11/1966
2670/72  ITMI (International Talent Management Incorporated) Bought 7/5/1966
2657  Artist Development was located directly Across West Grand Blvd from the Motown Row. Bought 1/12/1966See More

The Temptations VS. The Supremes!

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On February 8, 1969, ‘TBC’ by The Supremes with Temptations went to No.1 on the US album chart

Anna Gordy Gaye: January 28, 1922 – January 31, 2014

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Anna Ruby Gordy Gaye (née Gordy; January 28, 1922 – January 31, 2014) was an American businesswoman, composer and songwriter. An elder sister of Motown founder Berry Gordy, she became a record executive in the mid-to-late 1950s distributing records released on Checker and Gone Records before forming the Anna label with Billy Davis and sister Gwen. Gordy later became known as a songwriter for several hits including the Originals‘ “Baby, I’m for Real“, and at least two songs on Marvin Gaye‘s What’s Going On album. The first wife of Gaye, their turbulent marriage later served as inspiration for Gaye’s album, Here, My Dear.

Born in Milledgeville, Georgia, located in Baldwin County, Georgia, Gordy was the third eldest of Berry Gordy Sr. (Berry Gordy II) and Bertha Ida (née Fuller) Gordy’s eight children. Shortly after her birth in 1922, Gordy’s family relocated to Detroit. Following graduation from high school in 1940, Gordy relocated to California, which is where Gordy’s younger brother Berry moved to after he dropped out of high school. Returning back to Detroit in the mid-1950s, she and younger sister Gwen became operators of the photo concession at Detroit’s Flame Show Bar.

By the late 1950s, members of the Gordy family were getting involved with the music business. In 1956, Anna began her career distributing records with Checker Records. Around 1957, she distributed a couple recordings for Gone Records. In 1958, she founded the label, Anna Records, with musician Billy Davis. Gordy’s younger sister Gwen acted as co-partner with the label. The label was formed a year before Berry launched Tamla Records, later a subsidiary for Motown. Anna distributed Tamla’s first national hit, Barrett Strong‘s “Money (That’s What I Want)“. Artists such as David Ruffin and Joe Tex also recorded for the label while Marvin Gaye became a session musician with the company. After the label was absorbed by Motown in 1961, Gordy joined Motown as a songwriter. Some of Gordy’s early compositions were recorded by Gaye and Mary Wells. In 1965, Gordy co-wrote Stevie Wonder‘s “What Christmas Means to Me”.

Gordy later co-composed the Originals‘ hits, “Baby, I’m for Real” and “The Bells” alongside Marvin Gaye. Gordy’s name was included as a co-songwriter on two songs off Gaye’s 1971 album, What’s Going On, including “Flyin’ High (In the Friendly Sky)” and “God Is Love“. In 1973, Gordy’s name was included in the credits to the song, “Just to Keep You Satisfied“, which was first recorded in 1969 by the Monitors and also recorded by the Originals two years later. Gaye’s version was actually overdubbed from the Originals recording and reversed the song’s romantic lyrics for a more solemn view of the end of a marriage. Gordy eventually left Motown at the end of the 1970s and retired from the music industry.

Personal life

Gordy first met Marvin Gaye in 1959 when Gaye was just 20 years old, singing with Harvey and the New Moonglows. Gaye soon began working at Anna Records and soon developed an attraction to Gordy. They eventually began dating in 1960. After a three-year courtship, they married in June 1963. Inspired by their romance, Gaye penned hit singles based off Anna including “Stubborn Kind of Fellow“, “Pride & Joy” and “You’re a Wonderful One“. Of “Pride and Joy”, Gaye said, “When I composed ‘Pride and Joy’, I was head over heels in love with Anna. I just wrote what I felt about her, and what she did for me. She was my pride and joy.”

The marriage between Marvin and Anna was reportedly turbulent, leading to public spats. In order to bring some stability to their home life, Anna and Marvin adopted a little boy who was born on November 17, 1966. The boy was soon named after his adopted father (Marvin Pentz Gaye III). While the boy was said to have been naturally conceived by Anna and Marvin during Motown’s public relations stories of the couple, Marvin himself would confirm the adoption in David Ritz‘s Marvin biography, Divided Soul: The Life of Marvin Gaye. In later years, the identity of the mother was revealed as Denise Gordy.

In 1971, the couple moved to Hollywood. Two years later, the couple filed for legal separation with Gaye settling in with a young woman named Janis Hunter, with whom Gaye would have two children with. In November of 1975, Gordy filed for divorce. After nearly two years, the case was settled in Gordy’s favor after Gaye agreed to remit a portion of his royalties off his next album to Gordy. The resulting album, Here, My Dear, gave audiences a view of the marriage through Marvin’s point of view. Released in December 1978, Gordy heard the album and threatened to sue Marvin for $5 million for invasion of privacy. Nothing came of this threat.

In the 1980s, Marvin and Anna reconciled as friends and Anna was on hand with Marvin at industry events following the release of his comeback album, Midnight Love, in 1982. Gordy also attended the Grammy Awards in 1983 where Gaye won two of the trophies. Gaye’s death in 1984 devastated Gordy; later she and Marvin’s three children disposed of most of Gaye’s ashes near the Pacific Ocean following his cremation after his funeral while Anna herself kept a portion of Marvin’s ashes following his funeral.

When Gaye was honored with induction to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Gordy attended and accepted Gaye’s induction to the Hall of Fame on his behalf with Marvin Gaye III. Gordy never remarried following her divorce. Gordy’s last public appearance came in June 2008 when she attended the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center Heart Foundation event where brother Berry was being honored.

Gordy died on January 31, 2014, at the age of 92, following many years of declining health.

The Day Music Died: 55th Anniversary

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A Tribute and in Loving Memory and on this day in 1959.
Mr Buddy Holly 22 yrs Mr Richie Valens 17 yrs J.P. The Big Bopper 28 yrs… Mr Roger Peterson Pilot.

Diana Ross: The Boss!

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Diana is a 1980 album by American R&B and soul singer Diana Ross, released by Motown. Her 11th studio album, was, and remains, the biggest-selling studio collection of Ross’ career. All songs are composed, played and produced by Chic member…s Nile Rodgers and Bernard Edwards.
Conception Following the U.S. success of 1979’s The Boss, Ross wanted a fresher, more modern sound. Having heard production team Bernard Edwards and Nile Rodgers of Chic’s work in the famous Manhattan disco club, Studio 54, Ross approached the two about creating a new album of material for her that stated where she felt she was in her life and career at the time. Initially, Ross was not pleased with the album’s results. Following a preview of the record to be released in the aftermath of the anti-disco backlash, Frankie Crocker, an influential New York City disc jockey warned Ross that releasing the album in its original state would even lead to the end of her career.
Ross remixed the entire album, assisted by Motown engineer Russ Terrana, removing extended instrumental passages and speeding up the tracks’ tempos. The new mix also put Ross’ vocals front and center. The remixing of the master tapes and the re-recording of all Ross’ lead vocals were performed without the knowledge or approval of Rodgers and Edwards. When they were presented with the “official” version of Diana, the producers publicly objected and, at one point, even considered removing their names from the album’s list of credits. Motown and Ross persisted and the version released was Terrana’s smoother, more commercial mix of the album.
Rodgers and Edwards were contracted by Motown to produce a follow-up album, but, as Ross left the label, it was never created. Rodgers and Edwards sued Motown, unsuccessfully claiming that they were owed monies for creating & recording the original version of the album. In 1989, Rodgers and Ross collaborated on Workin’ Overtime(#3 US R&B), released upon Ross’ return to Motown. Edwards produced the 1984 single, “Telephone(#13 US R&B)”, from Ross’ “Swept Away” album, released the RCA record label.
Released in May 1980, the Diana album introduced Ross to a new generation of fans worldwide. Reaching number two on the Billboard 200 chart and number one on the Billboard Soul Albums Chart for 8 weeks, as well as yielding two top ten singles including the number-one single “Upside Down”, the album would sell over six million copies in the United States and be certified Platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America. In the UK it went Gold and spun off three successful singles; “Upside Down” (#2), “My Old Piano” (#5) and “I’m Coming Out” (#13). A fourth single, “Tenderness”, was also released in certain territories, reaching the top 40 in the Netherlands, and was later included on several greatest hits compilations. Some thirty years after its release diana remains Ross’ best-selling studio album to date having sold a total of over ten million copies worldwide.
Diana was one of four albums written and produced by Edwards and Rodgers in 1980, the other three being Sister Sledge’s Love Somebody Today, Sheila and B. Devotion’s King of the World including European hit single “Spacer”, and Chic’s fourth studio album Real People. Following the release of two more singles, the duet “Endless Love” with Lionel Richie and “It’s My Turn”, both worldwide hits, Ross left Motown and signed a then-record breaking $20 million recording deal with RCA Records. The first album for the label was 1981’s self-produced Why Do Fools Fall in Love, which went platinum and spawned two Top 10 hits in the US. Diana was remastered and released as a double CD in 2003 containing the original unremixed versions, together with a selection of other Motown dance tracks from the same period.
Track listing Original album All songs written by Bernard Edwards and Nile Rodgers. Side A “Upside Down” – 4:04 About this sound Listen (help·info) “Tenderness” – 3:52 “Friend to Friend” – 3:19 “I’m Coming Out” – 5:25 About this sound Listen
Side B “Have Fun (Again)” – 5:57 “My Old Piano” – 3:55 About this sound Listen “Now That You’re Gone” – 3:59 “Give Up” – 3:45
Note: The Canadian release on Quality Records places the tracks from side B on side A, and the tracks from side A on side B.
Deluxe Edition Disc one 9. “Upside Down” (Original Chic Mix) – 4:17 10. “Tenderness” (Original Chic Mix) – 5:10 11. “Friend to Friend” (Original Chic Mix) – 3:20 12. “I’m Coming Out” (Original Chic Mix) – 6:01 13. “Have Fun (Again)” (Original Chic Mix) – 7:09 14. “My Old Piano” (Original Chic Mix) – 4:52 15. “Now That You’re Gone” (Original Chic Mix) – 3:40 16. “Give Up” (Original Chic Mix) – 3:59 Tracks 9-16 previously unreleased
Disc two “Love Hangover” (Extended Alternate Mix) (McLeod, Sawyer) – 10:25 Previously unreleased mix. Original version appears on 1976 album Diana Ross “Your Love Is So Good for Me” (12-Inch Version) (Peterson) – 6:36 Previously unreleased. Original version appears on 1977 album Baby It’s Me “Top of the World” (Snow) – 3:09 From 1977 album Baby It’s Me “Lovin’, Livin’ and Givin'” (Ross album remix) (Davis, Stover) – 5:12 From 1978 album Ross. Original version appears on 1978 original motion picture soundtrack Thank God It’s Friday “What You Gave Me” (12-Inch Version) (Ashford, Simpson) – 6:08 Original version appears on 1978 album Ross “You Were the One” (Patterson, Wright) – 4:04 From 1978 album Ross “The Diana Ross & the Supremes Medley of Hits” (12-inch Mix) (Dozier, Holland, Holland) – 9:59 Originally released as 12″ single in 1977.
Re-released as 12″ and edited 7″ single in 1980 and 1981. “No One Gets the Prize/The Boss” (12-Inch Re-Edit) (Ashford, Simpson) – 9:41 Original versions appear on 1979 album The Boss “I Ain’t Been Licked” (12-inch Mix) (Ashford, Simpson) – 5:18 Original version appears on 1979 album The Boss “Fire Don’t Burn” (David, Holland, Holland) – 3:26 Previously unreleased recording, recorded 1975-1977. Proposed for inclusion on cancelled 1981 album Revelations “We Can Never Light That Old Flame Again” (Alternate Mix) (David, Holland, Holland) – 4:38 First released version was a non-album single in 1982, and was remixed by Berry Gordy and James Anthony Carmichael. The original mix featured here first appeared on a Diana Ross budget cassette in 1990. “You Build Me Up to Tear Me Down” (Holland, Holland, Miller) – 5:42 Previously unreleased recording, recorded 1975-1977.
Mixed in 1978 for possible inclusion on album Ross “Sweet Summertime Livin'” (Stover) – 4:25 Previously unreleased recording, recorded 1975-1977. Mixed in 1978 for possible inclusion on album Ross. Remixed in 1981 and proposed for inclusion on cancelled album Revelations
Personnel Alfa Anderson – vocals Fonzi Thornton – vocals Luci Martin – vocals Michelle Cobbs – vocals Bernard Edwards – bass guitar Nile Rodgers – guitar Tony Thompson – drums Andy Schwartz – keyboards Raymond Jones – keyboards Eddie Daniels – saxophone Meco Monardo – trombone Bob Milliken – trumpet Valerie Haywood (The Chic Strings) – strings Cheryl Hong (The Chic Strings) – strings Karen Milne (The Chic Strings) – strings Gene Orloff – conductor
Production Bernard Edwards – producer for Chic Organization Ltd. Nile Rodgers – producer for Chic Organization Ltd. Bob Clearmountain – engineer proposed side A; tracks 1-4 Bill Scheniman – engineer proposed side B; tracks 1-4 James Farber – engineer Neil Dorfsman – engineer Ralph Osborn – engineer Abdoulaye Soumare – assistant engineer Jeff Hendrickson – assistant engineer Lucy Laurie – assistant engineer Peter Robbins – assistant engineer Dennis King – mastering All songs originally recorded at Power Station in New York. Lead vocal re-recordings: Electric Lady, New York; Motown/Hitsville U.S.A. Studios, Hollywood, California. All songs originally mixed at: Power Station, New York. Remixed by Russ Terrana and Diana Ross at Artisan Sound Recorders, Hollywood, California. Mastered at Atlantic Studios, N.Y

Berry Gordy: Man Of Vision

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Berry Gordy, cultural icon and founder of Motown Records has made unparalleled contributions to music and American history. He is responsible for acts such as Smokey Robinson, the Jackson 5 and Diana Ross and the Supremes. His musical legacy was instrumental in his signees shattering racial barriers with their music that boasted mass appeal and introduced the world to the “Motown Sound.” Successful in every venture he has chosen to embark on, Gordy is also a filmmaker, songwriter and civil rights activist.

Pattie Boyd: The Ultimate Trouphy!

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Patricia Anne “Pattie” Boyd (born 17 March 1944) is a model, photographer and author from the United Kingdom, best known as the first wife of both George Harrison and Eric Clapton. In August 2007, she published her autobiography Wonderful Tonight. Her photographs of Harrison and Clapton, titled Through the Eye of a Muse have been exhibited in Dublin, Sydney, Toronto, Moscow, London and throughout the United States.

Boyd was born on 17 March 1944, in Taunton, Somerset, and was the first child to Colin Ian Langdon Boyd, and Diana Frances Boyd (née Drysdale), who were married on 14 September 1942. The Boyds moved to West Lothian, Scotland where her brother Colin was born in 1946. The Boyd family moved to Guildford, Surrey, where her sister, Jenny Boyd was born in 1947.Boyd’s youngest sister, Paula, was born at Nakuru hospital, Kenya, in 1951.The Boyds lived in Nairobi, Kenya, from 1948 to 1953, after her father’s discharge from the Royal Air Force. Boyd’s parents divorced in 1952, and her mother married Robert Gaymer-Jones in February 1953, in Tanganyika (now Tanzania). The family returned to England where Boyd gained two half brothers, David J.B. (b. 1954) and Robert, Jr. (b. 1955).

Boyd attended Hazeldean School in Putney, the St Agnes and St Michael Convent Boarding School in East  Grinstead, and St Martha’s Convent in Hadley Wood, Hertfordshire (where she received three GCE O level passes in 1961). Boyd moved to London in 1962 and worked as a shampoo girl at Elizabeth Arden‘s salon, until a client who worked for a fashion magazine inspired her to begin work as a model.

Boyd began her fashion career in 1962, modelling in London, New York and Paris. She was photographed by David Bailey and Terence Donovan, and appeared on the cover of Vogue. Boyd appeared on the cover of the UK and Italian editions of Vogue magazine in 1969, with other popular models of the day, such as Twiggy, who based her early modelling appearance on Boyd. Boyd was asked by Gloria Stavers to write a column for 16 Magazine, and appeared in a TV commercial promoting Smith’s crisps. She was cast for A Hard Day’s Night, where she met George Harrison.

Boyd exhibited her photos of Harrison and Clapton, at the San Francisco Art Exchange on Valentine’s Day 2005, in a show entitled Through the Eye of a Muse. The exhibition appeared in San Francisco and London during 2006, and in La Jolla, California in 2008.Boyd’s photography was shown in Dublin and in Toronto in 2008 and at the Blender Gallery in Sydney, Australia and in Almaty, Kazakhstan in 2009 and 2010. Her exhibit “Yesterday and Today: The Beatles and Eric Clapton” was shown in Santa Catalina Island in California, and at the National Geographic Headquarters in Washington, DC in 2011.

In 2007 Boyd published her autobiography, which includes some of her photographs, titled Wonderful Today in the UK; in the US it was published with the title Wonderful Tonight: George Harrison, Eric Clapton, and Me. In the United States, Boyd’s book debuted at the top of the New York Times Best Seller list.

1964, Boyd met Harrison during the filming of A Hard Day’s Night, in which she was cast as a schoolgirl.[12][23] Her only line in the film was asking “Prisoners?”, but she later appeared in the “I Should Have Known Better” segment. Boyd was “semi-engaged” to photographer Eric Swayne at the time, thus declining a date proposal from Harrison. Several days later, after ending her relationship with Swayne, she went back to work on the film and Harrison asked her out on a date for a second time. The couple went to a private gentlemen’s club called the Garrick Club, chaperoned by the Beatles’ manager, Brian Epstein. According to Boyd, one of the first things Harrison said to her on the film set was: “Will you marry me? Well, if you won’t marry me, will you have dinner with me tonight?”

Boyd had her first encounter with LSD in early 1965 when the couple’s dentist, John Riley, secretly laced her coffee with the drug during a dinner party at his home.[As she was getting ready to leave with Harrison, John and Cynthia Lennon, Riley told them that he had spiked their drinks and tried to convince them to stay.Outside, Boyd was in an agitated state from the drug and threatened to break a store window, but Harrison pulled her away. Later, when Boyd and her group were in an elevator on their way up to the Ad Lib club, they mistakenly believed it was on fire.

Later that year, Boyd moved into Kinfauns with Harrison.The couple were engaged on 25 December 1965, and married on 21 January 1966, in a ceremony at a registry office in Ashley Road, Epsom, with Paul McCartney as best man. Later, the couple went on a honeymoon in Barbados. In September, Boyd flew with Harrison to Bombay to visit sitar virtuoso Ravi Shankar, before returning to London on 23 October 1966. The following year, Boyd attended the Our World broadcast of “All You Need Is Love“.

Through her interest in Eastern mysticism and her membership in the Spiritual Regeneration Movement, she inspired all four Beatles to meet the Indian mystic Maharishi Mahesh Yogi in London on 24 August 1967, which resulted in a visit to the Maharishi’s seminar in Bangor, the following day. Boyd accompanied Harrison on the Beatles’ visit to the Maharishi’s ashram in Rishikesh, India, in February 1968.In March 1970, Boyd moved with Harrison from Kinfauns to Friar Park, a Victorian neo-Gothic mansion, in Henley-on-Thames.

In 1973, Boyd’s marriage to Harrison began to fail and she had an affair with Faces guitarist Ronnie Wood. She separated from Harrison in 1974 and their divorce was finalised on 9 June 1977.Boyd said her decision to end their marriage and leave Harrison was based largely on his repeated infidelities, culminating in an affair with Ringo Starr‘s wife Maureen, which Boyd called “the final straw”. Boyd characterised the last year of her marriage as “fuelled by alcohol and cocaine”, and claimed “George used coke excessively, and I think it changed him … it froze his emotions and hardened his heart.”According to Boyd, Harrison’s songs “I Need You” and “Something” were written for her.

Marriage to Eric Clapton

In the late 1960s, Clapton and Harrison became close friends, and began writing and recording music together. At this time Clapton fell in love with Boyd.His 1970 album with Derek and the Dominos, Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs, was written to proclaim his love for her, particularly the hit song “Layla“.When Boyd rebuffed his advances late that year, Clapton descended into heroin addiction and self-imposed exile for three years. Boyd moved in with Clapton and married him in 1979

. Her struggles within the marriage were masked by her public image with Clapton. Although Boyd drank and admits to past drug use, she never became an alcoholic or a drug addict like Clapton did. Boyd left Clapton in September 1984, and divorced him in 1988. Her stated reasons were Clapton’s years of alcoholism, as well as his numerous affairs including one with Italian model Lory Del Santo. In 1989, her divorce was granted on the grounds of “infidelity and unreasonable behaviour”.Boyd believes she was the inspiration for the songs: “Bell Bottom Blues” and “Wonderful Tonight“.

 

 

 

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