Archives for : SEX

jan Gaye: After the Dance: My Life with Marvin Gaye

 

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Gaye, Jan. After the Dance: My Life with Marvin Gaye. Amistad: HarperCollins. May 2015. 224p. ISBN 9780062135513. $25.99; ebk. ISBN 9780062135537. MEMOIR
On her 17th birthday, Janis Hunter met rhythm-and-blues legend Marvin Gaye as he was stumbling out of his first marriage, and despite a 16-year age difference, they launched a too-hot-to-handle affair.

Their own marriage eventually collapsed under the weight of fame, drug abuse, and domestic strife. Here, Jan speaks out for the first time since Marvin was shot and killed by his father in 1984. Reportedly sizzling stuff, with many famed music figures of the day drifting through; with a 50,000-copy first printing.

 

This searing memoir of drugs, sex, and old school R&B from the wife of legendary soul icon Marvin Gaye.

On her seventeenth birthday in 1973, Janice Hunter met Marvin Gaye-the soulful prince of Motown with the seductive liquid voice whose chart-topping, socially conscious albumWhat”s Going Onmade him a superstar two years earlier. Despite a sixteen-year-age difference and Marvin”s marriage to the sister of Berry Gordy, Motown”s founder, the star-struck teenager and the emotionally volatile singer began a scorching relationship.

One moment Jan was studying high school history; the next she was accompanying Marvin to parties with other pop stars, lounging with Don Cornelius on the set ofSoul Train,and helping to discover new talent like Frankie Beverly. But the distractions and burdens of fame, the chaos of dysfunctional families, and the irresistible temptations of drugs overshadowed the love they shared and their marriage disintegrated.

Silent since Marvin”s tragic death in 1984, Jan at last opens up, sharing the moving, erotically charged story of one of music history”s most fabled marriages. Unsparing in its honesty and insight, illustrated with sixteen pages of color and black-and-white photos,After the Dancereveals what it”s like to ride shotgun on a wave of fame and self-destruction with a tortured genius who helped transform popular culture and whose artistry continues to be celebrated today.

 

 

Kathy Etchingham: “Through Gypsy Eyes”

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My book “Through Gypsy Eyes” is now available on Amazon in the Kindle format at an Amazon sale price of $4.99.
http://www.amazon.com/…/ob…/ASIN/B009AIXGF4/kathetchtheof-20

Yandy & Co: Baby On Board?

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Allegedly Mandeecee’s of Love and Hip Hop New York has another child on the way, but it’s not with his current girl Yandy Smith!

Billy Idol:”Dancing With Myself,”

 

 

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Billy will release his self-written memoir, “Dancing With Myself,” on October 7th 2014 The book is bold, searingly candid, and written by Idol himself in his inimitable voice.

Pre-order the book here: http://smarturl.it/dancingwithmyself

Stay tuned for news on Billy’s return to the studio and continued touring in coming weeks!

Donald Sterling vs. V Stiviano: Part I

untitledThe confessions of racist LA Clippers boss Donald Sterling can today be revealed in explosive NEW secret recordings obtained by MailOnline.

During a phone call with a close friend in the wake of the racism scandal that has rocked American basketball, Sterling speaks candidly about his true feelings towards his former girlfriend V. Stiviano.

The secret recordings were made by Sterling’s long time friend, a black hip hop artist called Maserati, who says he leaked the phone conversation, because, in his view, the Clippers boss crossed the line.

The tapes, recorded just four or five days after the scandal broke, paint a very different picture to that presented to CNN host Anderson Cooper in an interview on Monday night.

 

That was one of Donald Sterling, billionaire, the powerful and defiant owner of one of the most famous basketball teams in America.

Instead, the tapes present him as an old man, confused, shocked and ’embarrassed’ that his life’s work has brought so low by his weakness for a young woman who taped his private conversations as he was desperately trying to bed her.

He feels foolish that he fell for it, but still doesn’t accept that his views may be considered racist. Instead, he insists that he is the victim and that the wannabe model, 31, is the ‘most discriminatory person I have ever met’.

 

In the recording, which runs to more than an hour, he claims Stiviano confided in him that she wakes every morning ‘wishing I was white’.Sterling claims that such is her insecurity about her African-American roots that Stiviano bleaches her skin to appear pale and has vowed never to date a black man.He goes on to claim that the ‘vast majority’ of white people don’t think about color – but black people do.

Sterling, 81, reveals how Stiviano – a stunning brunette 50 years his junior – lured him into her trap and says he lavished her with millions of dollars as he tried to bed her.

 

Sterling also claims that Stiviano’s family call her ‘The Monster’ because she mistreats them and starves her younger sisters if they disobey her.

Sterling tells how his former lover tried to blackmail him by asking for money just weeks before the original damning recordings exposing the billionaire’s deep-rooted racism were leaked.

‘V IS THE RACIST NOT ME’

Sterling claims Stiviano is the true racist, not him, and she has deep-rooted issues with the black community. ‘She is the most discriminatory person I have ever met,’ Sterling told his friend.

Stiviano allegedly told him: ‘God made me black. I didn’t want to be black. All my brothers and sisters are Mexican. Do you know what it is like to wake up every morning and want to be white?’

He says Stiviano, who has a Mexican mother and an African-American father, hates her dark coloring so much that she bleaches her skin in a bid to appear more ‘white’.

‘She tried so hard to make her skin white,’ said Sterling. ‘She did it every night – her feet and her hands. She asked me “did I like black skin?” I really didn’t think about the color of her skin.’

Sterling clearly had other things on his mind during this exchange with his much younger girlfriend, ‘I’m just waiting to play with her,’ he told his friend.

She then told him: ‘I will never go with a black guy.’ Sterling added: ‘Then I said don’t bring any to the games. I’m so stupid…I was just jealous.’

Sterling also claimed mix-race Stiviano would often bemoan her upbringing as a ‘black’ child. Stiviano was raised in a rundown Latino area of San Antonio, Texas before moving to LA as a teenager.  

Sterling said: ‘She was really a fighter and it was always about race – about you know – that’s what she liked to talk about and how she had such a hard time as a black girl growing up in LA downtown.’

‘V LURED ME INTO A TRAP’

Sterling reveals how Stiviano snared him after leading him in to a private room in his LA Clippers office.

The pair were introduced at a Superbowl bash by former LA politician Nate Holden, an old acquaintance of Sterling’s who is aged 84. Former Oakland Raiders owner Al Davies was also in the group.

‘She came up to me and said “I couldn’t stop thinking about you for two months”…That will make anyone feel good. She said: “You need me”. When a girl says something like that you’re going to follow her for a long way’
 

Sterling says he remembers a pretty girl approaching him and showering him with flattery before saying: ‘I wanna be your friend’.

Two months later the excited billionaire welcomed Stiviano into his office at the LA Clippers.

Sterling told his friend: ‘She came up to me and said “I couldn’t stop thinking about you for two months”…That will make anyone feel good. She said: “You need me”. When a girl says something like that you’re going to follow her for a long way.

‘She says is there any privacy here in this building. Well I own the whole building so I said yeah. “Well can we go talk,” she said. “I wanna be your friend”. I said I don’t need any friends. And she said “yeah you need me”.

So she takes me into a room and she does her thing and then she says you wanna go for a walk I said OK and so I walk with her to her car and she says, “well what do you think, do you think you need a friend?”’  

‘V IS A MONSTER WHO IS MEAN TO HER FAMILY’

Sterling accuses Stiviano of treating her family with a ‘whip’.

He said the demanding woman orders her younger siblings around and ‘puts them in a room’.

He said: ‘If you talk to them people you’ll get all this information she’s just mean. She won’t feed the girls – her sisters – they go to bed without dinner. Unbelievable. She’s a monster, they call her “The Monster”. She’s just 30-years-old and she’s the only one that’s got money that she got from me – she never had it before.

‘And she was gonna wheel barrow over everybody – everybody – she told people where to sleep, where to go what to do and to drive her.’

Sterling says Stiviano’s family, who are from San Antonio, Texas, but originate from Mexico, are ‘fabulous’.

Here’s a poor girl a Mexican girl never had anything in her life never had food never had clothes and I mean she has a fabulous body and she loves to have sex and she’s just fun and I think what if I give her some money and what if I helped her. And what if I helped her family. I changed the whole family’s life.

V WAS ‘AN ANIMAL’ IN THE BEDROOM

Sterling claims stunning V. Stiviano ‘loves sex’ and was an ‘animal’ between the sheets and admits he paid a ‘high-price’ to sleep with her.

And he told his friend that he fears the stunning wannabe model may have saucy photos of them in bed together, which he worries may be leaked to the media.

‘I am an 80-year-old man and tried to make it with a girl. I did it before. It wasn’t easy. I’d say anything to her. She was an animal’

Sterling said: ‘I’m paying a very high price for trying to get a girl hot and make it with her. Everybody in the world wants to f*** her. Listen, I’m telling you she was hot. It took me maybe an hour to get there but it was hot. So why did I do it? Because I’m 80-years-old.’

Earlier in the conversation he admitted that he was ‘embarrassed’ that a man of his age was trying to bed a girl 50 years younger than him.

‘I am an 80-year-old man and tried to make it with a girl. I did it before. It wasn’t easy. I’d say anything to her. She was an animal.’

He added: ‘I wanted to help her as she never had food, never had clothes. She has a fabulous body and loves to have sex. What if I helped her and her family? I hate to admit it in front of my wife’.

A Spectacle in Color: The Lesbian and Gay Subculture of Jazz Age Harlem.

 

 

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A Spectacle in Color: The Lesbian and Gay Subculture of Jazz Age  Harlem.

Eric Garber

At the beginning of the twentieth century, a homosexual subculture, uniquely  Afro-American  in substance, began to take shape in New York’s Harlem. Throughout the so- called Harlem  Renaissance period, roughly 1920 to 1935, black lesbians and gay men were  meeting each  other. street corners, socializing in cabarets and rent parties, and worshiping in  church on  Sundays, creating a language, a social structure, and a complex network of  institutions. Some  were discreet about their sexual identities; others openly expressed their  personal feelings. The  community they built attracted white homosexuals as well as black, creating  friendships  between people of disparate ethnic and economic backgrounds and building  alliances for  progressive social change. But the prosperity of the 1920s was short-lived, and  the Harlem gay  subculture quickly declined following the Stock Market crash of 1929 and the  repeal of  Prohibition, soon becoming only a shadow of its earlier self. Nevertheless, the  traditions and  institutions created by Harlem lesbians and gay men during the Jazz Age  continue to this day.

The key historical factor in the development of the lesbian and gay  subculture in Harlem  was the massive migration of thousands of Afro-Americans to northern urban  areas after the turn  of the century. Since the beginning of American slavery, the vast majority of  blacks had lived in  rural southern states. American participation in World War I led to an increase in  northern  industrial production and brought an end to immigration, which resulted in  thousands of  openings in northern factories becoming available to blacks. Within two  decades, large  communities of black Americans had developed in most northern urban areas.  So significant  was this shift in population that it is now referred to as the “Great Migration.”  Black communities  developed in Chicago, Detroit, and Buffalo, but the largest and most spectacular  was Harlem,  which became the mecca for Afro-Americans from all over the world. Nowhere  else could you  find a geographic area so large, so concentrated, really a city within a city,  populated entirely by  blacks. There were black schoolteachers, black entrepreneurs, black police  officers, and even  black millionaires. A spirit was in the air-of hope, progress, and possibilities- which proved  particularly alluring to the young and unmarried. Harlem’s streets soon filled with  their music,  their voices, and their laughter.

They called themselves “New Negroes,” Harlem was their capital, and  they manifested a  new militancy and pride. Black servicemen had been treated with a degree of  respect and given  a taste of near-equality while in Europe during the World War; their experiences  influenced their  expectations when they returned home. Participation in the war effort had given  the entire black  community a sense of involvement in the American process and led them to  demand their place  in the mainstream of American life. Marcus Garvey, the charismatic West Indian  orator, had  thousands of followers in his enormous black nationalist “Back to Africa”  movement. W. E. B.  DuBois and his National Association for the Advancement of Colored People  (NAACP), with its  radical integrationist position, generally appealed to a more educated, middle- class following,  as did Charles W. Johnson’s National Urban League, but were just as militant in  their call for  racial justice. A variety of individuals and organizations generated Afro-American  pride and  solidarity.

The New Negro movement created a new kind of art. Harlem, as the New  Negro Capital,  became a worldwide center for Afro-American jazz, literature, and the fine arts.  Many black  musicians, artists, writers, and entertainers were drawn to the vibrant black  uptown  neighborhood. Duke Ellington, Fletcher Henderson, Fats Waller, Cab Calloway,  Bessie Smith,  and Ethel Waters played in Harlem nightclubs. Langston Hughes, Zora Hurston,  and Countee  Cullen published in the local newspapers. Art galleries displayed the work of  Aaron Douglas and  Richmond Barthé. These creative talents incorporated the emerging black urban  social con  sciousness into their art. The resulting explosion of self-consciously  AfroAmerican creativity,  now known as the “Harlem Renaissance,” had a profound impact on the  subsequent  development of American arts.

The social and sexual attitudes of Harlem’s new immigrants were best  reflected in the  blues, a distinctly Afro-American folk music that had developed in rural southern  black  communities following the Civil War. Structurally simple, yet open to countless  subtleties, the  blues were immensely popular within American black communities throughout  the 1920s. They  told of loneliness, homesickness, and poverty, of love and good luck, and they  provided a  window into the difficult, often brutal. world of the New Negro immigrant.

Homosexuality was clearly part of this world. “There’s two things got me  puzzled, there’s  two things I don’t understand,” moaned blues great Bessie Smith, “that’s a  mannish-acting  woman and a lisping, swishing, womanish-acting man.” In “Sissy Blues,” Ma  Rainey  complained of her husband’s infidelity with a homosexual named “Miss Kate.”  Lucille Bogan, in  her “B.D. Women Blues,” warned that “B.D. [bulldagger] women sure is rough;  they drink up  many a whiskey and they sure can strut their stuff.” The “sissies” and “bull  daggers” mentioned  in the blues were ridiculed for their cross-gender behavior, but neither shunned  nor hated. “Boy  in the Boat” for example, recorded in 1930 by George Hanna, counseled “When  you see two  women walking hand in hand, just shake your head and try to understand.” In  fact, the  casualness toward sexuality, so common in the blues, sometimes extended to  homosexual  behavior. In “Sissy Man Blues,” a traditional tune recorded by nurnerous male  blues singers  over the years, the singer demanded “if you can’t bring me a woman, bring me a  sissy man.”  George Hanna’s “Freakish Blues,” recorded in 1931, is even more explicit about  potential  sexual fludity. The blues reflected a culture that accepted sexuality, including  homosexual  behavior and identities, as a natural part of life.

Despite the relatively tolerant attitude shown toward homosexuality by  Afro-American  culture, black lesbians and gay men still had a difficult time. Like other black  migrants, they  soon learned that racism crossed the Mason-Dixon line. Economic problems,  unemployment,  and segregation plagued black communities across the North. High rents and  housing  shortages made privacy a luxury for Harlem’s newcomers. Moreover black  homosexuals, like  their white counterparts, were continually under attack from the police and  judicial systems. In  1920, young lesbian Mabel Hampton, recently arrived in Harlem from Winston- Salem, North  Carolina, was arrested on trumped-up prostitution charges and spent two years  in Bedford Hills  Reformatory.  Augustus Granville Dill, distinguished business editor of the  NAACP’s Crisis and  personal protégé of DuBois, had his political career destroyed when he was  arrested for  soliciting sex in a public restroom.  Black gay people were also under attack from  the  developing psychiatric institutions; Jonathan Katz cites a tragic case in which a  young black gay  man was incarcerated for most of the 1920s at the Worcester (Massachusetts)  State Hospital.  But in spite of racial oppression, economic hardship, and homophobic  persecution, black  lesbians and gay men were able to build a thriving community of their own within  existing Afro- American institutions and traditions.

Private parties were the best place for Harlem lesbians and gay men to  socialize,  providing safety and privacy. “We used to go to parties every other night…. The  girls all had the  parties,” remembered Mabel Hampton. Harlem parties were extremely varied;  the most common  kind was the “rent party.” Like the blues, rent parties had been brought north in  the Great  Migration. Few of Harlem’s new residents had much money, and sometimes rent  was hard to  come by. To raise funds, they sometimes threw enormous parties, inviting the  public and  charging admission. There would be dancing and jazz, and bootleg liquor for  sale in the kitchen.  It is about just such a party that Bessie Smith sang her famous “Gimme a Pigfoot  and a Bottle of  Beer.” On any given Saturday night there were scores of these parties  throughout Harlem, often  with those in attendance not knowing their hosts. The dancing and merriment  would continue  until dawn, and by morning the landlord could be paid. Lesbians and gay men  were active  participants in rent parties. The New York Age, one of Harlem’s newspapers,  complained in  1926:

One of these rent parties a few weeks ago was the scene of a tragic  crime in which one  jealous woman cut the throat of another, because the two were rivals for the  affections of a third  woman. The whole situation was on a par with the recent Broadway play [about  lesbianism,  The Captive], imported from Paris, although the underworld tragedy took  place in this  locality. In the meantime, the combination of bad gin, jealous women, a carving  knife, and a rent  party is dangerous to the health of all concerned.

At another Harlem rent party, satirically depicted in Wallace Thurman’s 1932  Harlem  Renaissance novel Infants of the Spring, a flamboyantly bisexual Harlem  artist proudly  displayed his new protégé, a handsome, bootblack, to the “fanciful aggregation  of Greenwich  Village uranians” he had invited.

Gay men could always be found at the literary gatherings of Alexander  Gumby. Gumby,  who had arrived in Harlem near the turn of the century, immediately became  entranced with the  theatrical set and decided to open a salon to attract them. He worked as a postal  clerk and  acquired a patron, eventually renting a large studio on Fifth Avenue between  131st and 132nd  streets. Known as Gumby’s Bookstore because of the hundreds of books that  lined the walls,  the salon drew many theatrica and artistic luminaries. White author Samuel  Steward remembers  being taken to Gumby’s one evening by a lesbian friend and enjoying a delightful  evening of  “reefer,” bathtub gin, a game of truth, and homosexual exploits.

Certainly the most opulent parties in Harlem were thrown by the heiress  A’Lelia Walker.  Walker was a striking, tall, dark-skinned wondan who was rarely seen without  her riding crop  and her imposing, jeweled turban. She was the only daughter of Madame C. J.  Walker, a former  washerwoman who had made millions marketing her own hair-straightening  process. When she  died, Madame Walker left virtually her entire fortune to A’Lelia. Whereas  Madame Walker had  been civic-minded, donating thousands of dollars to charity, A’Lelia used most of  her inheritance  to throw lavish parties in her palatial Hudson River estate, Villa Lewaro. and at  her Manhattan  dwelling on 136th Street. Because A’Lelia adored the company of lesbians and  gay men, her  parties had a distinctly gay ambience. Elegant homosexuals such as Edward  Perry, Edna  Thomas. Harold Jackman, and Caska Bonds were her closest friends. So were  scores of white  celebrities. Novelist Marjorie Worthington would later remember:

We went several times that winter to Madame Allelia [sic] Walker’s Thursday “at-homes” on a beautiful street in Harlem known as,Sugar Hill….”  [Madame Walker’s]  lavishly furnished house was a gathering place not only for artists and authors  and theatrical  stars of her own race, but for celebrities from all over the world. Drinks and food  were served,  and there was always music, generously performed enthusiastically  received.

Everyone from chorus girls to artists to socialites to visiting royalty would  come at least  once to enjoy her hospitality.

Another Afro-American institution that tolerated, and frequenty encouraged,  homosexual  patronage was the “buffet flat.” “Buffet flats were after-hours spots that were  usually in  someone’s apartment,” explained celebrated entertainer Bricktop, “the type of  place where gin  was poured out of milk pitchers.”

Essentially private apartments where rooms  could be rented  by the night, buffet flats had sprung up during the late 1800s to provide  overnight  accommodations to black travelers refused service in white-owned hotels. By the  1920s, buffet  flats developed a wilder reputation. Some were raucous establishments where  illegal activities  such as drinking, gambling, and prostitution were available. Others offered a  variety of sexual  pleasures cafeteriastyle. A Detroit buffet flat of the latter sort, which Ruby Smith  remembered  visiting with her aunt, Bessie Smith, catered to all variety of sexual tastes. It was  “an open  house, everything goes on in that house”:

They had a ****** there that was so great that people used to come there  just to watch  him make love to another man. He was that great. He’d give a tongue bath and  everything. By  the time he got to the front of that guy he was shaking like a leaf. People used to  pay good just  to go in there and see him do his act…. That same house had a woman that  used to . . . take a  cigarette, light it, and puff it with her pussy.  A real educated pussy.

In Harlem, Hazel Valentine ran a similar sex circus on 140th Street.  Called  “The Daisy  Chain” or the “101 Ranch,” it catered to all varieties of sexual tastes, and  featured entertainers  such as “Sewing Machine Bertha” and an enormous transvestite named  “Clarenz.” The Daisy  Chain became so notorious that both Fats Waller and Count Basie composed  tunes  commemorating it.

There were also buffet flats that particularly welcomed gay men. On  Saturday nights  pianist David Fontaine would regularly throw stylish flat parties for his many gay  friends. Other  noted hosts of gay male revelry were A’Lelia Walker’s friend Caska Bonds,  Eddie Manchester  and the older Harlem couple, Jap and Saul. The most notorious such flat was  run by Clinton  Moore. Moore was an elegant, light-skinned homosexual, described as an  “American version of  the original … Proust’s Jupien.” Moore had a fondness for celebrities, and his  parties allegedly  atracted luminaries like Cole Porter, Cary Grant, and society page columnist  Maury Paul.  Moore’s entertainments were often low-down and dirty. According to Helen  Lawrenson,

Clinton Moore’s . . . boasted a young black entertainer named Joey, vho  played the piano  and sang but whose specialty was to remove his clothes and extinguish a lighted  candle by  sitting on it until it disappeared. I never saw this feat but everyone else seemed  to have and I  was told that he was often hired to perform at soirees of the elite. ‘He sat on  lighted candles at  one of the Vanderbilts’,’ my informant said.

Somewhat more public-and therefore less abandoned-were Harlem’s  speakeasies,  where gays were usually forced to hide their preferences and to blend in with the  heterosexual  patrons. Several Harlem speakeasies though, some little more than dives,  catered specifically  to the “pansy” trade. One such place, an “open” speakeasy since there was no  doorman to keep  the uninvited away, was located on the northwest corner of 126th Street and  Seventh Avenue. It  was a large, dimly lit place where gay men could go to pick up “rough trade.”  Artist Bruce  Nugent, who occasionelly visited the place, remembered it catering to “rough  queers . . . the  kind that fought better than truck drivers and swished better than Mae West.”   Ethel Waters  remembered loaning her gowns to the transvestites who frequented Edmond’s  Cellar, a low-life  saloon at 132nd Street and Fifth Avenue. Lulu Belle’s on Lenox Avenue was  another hangout for  female impersonators, named after the famous Broadway melodrama of 1926  starring Leonore  Ulric. A more sophisticated crowd of black gay men gathered nightly at the Hot  Cha, at 132nd  Street and Seventh Avenue, to listen to Jimmy Daniels sing and Garland Wilson  play piano.

Perhaps the most famous gay-oriented club of the era was Harry  Hansberry’s Clam House, a  narrow, smoky speakeasy on 133rd Street. The Clam House featured Gladys  Bentley, a 250- pound, masculine, darkskinned lesbian, who performed all night long in a white  tuxedo and top  hat.  Bentley, a talented pianist with a magnificent, growling voice, was  celebrated for inventing  obscene Iyrics to popular contemporary melodies. Langston Hughes called her  “an amazing  exhibition of musical energy.” Eslanda Robeson, wife of actor Paul Robeson,  gushed to a friend,  “Gladys Bentley is grand. I’ve heard her three nights, and will never be the  same!”  Schoolteacher Harold Jackman wrote to his friend Countee Cullen, “When  Gladys sings ‘St.  James Infirmary,’ it makes you weep your heart out.”

A glimpse into a speakeasy, based in part on the Clam House. is provided in  Blair Niles’  1931 gay novel Strange Brother. The Lobster Pot is a smoky room in Harlem,  simply furnished  with a couple of tables, a piano, and a kitchen, where white heterosexual  journalist June  Westwood, Strange Brother’s female protagonist, is first introduced to  Manhattan’s gay  subculture. The Lobster Pot features a predominantly gay male clientel and an  openly lesbian  entertainer named Sybil. “What rhythm!”  June comments to her companions.  “And the way  she’s dressed!” Westbrook finds the atmosphere intoxicating, but abruptly ends  her visit when  she steps outside and witnesses the entrapment of an effeminate black gay man  by the police.

Decidedly safer were the frequent Harlem costume balls, where both men  and women could  dress as they pleased and dance with whom they wished. Called “spectacles in  color” by poet  La Igston Hughes, they were attended by thousands. Several cities hosted  similar functions, but  the Harlem balls were anticipated with particular excitement. “This dance has  been going on a  long time,” observed Hughes, “and . . . is very famous among the male  masqueraders of the  eastern seaboard, who come from Boston and Philadelphia, Pittsburgh and  Atlantic City to  attend.”  Taylor Gordon, a noted concert singer, wrote in 1929:

The last big ball I attended where these men got the most of the prizes for  acting and  looking more like ladies than the ladies did themselves, was at the Savoy in  Harlem…. The  show that was put on that night for a dollar admission, including the privilege to  dance, would  have made a twenty-five dollar George White’s “Scandals” opening look like a  side show in a  circus.

The largest balls were the annual events held by the Hamilton Lodge at the  regal Rockland  Palace, which could accommodate up to six thousand people. Only slightly  smaller were the  balls given irregularly at the dazzling Savoy Ballroom, with its crystal chandeliers  and elegant  marble staircase. The organizers would obtain a police permit making the ball,  and its  participants, legal for the evening. The highlight of the event was the beauty  contest, in which  the fashionably dressed drags would vie for the title of Queen of the Ball.

Charles Henri Ford and Parker Tyler’s classic 1933 gay novel The  Young and Evil  suggests that these balls were just as popular with white gays as with black.  Julian, the white  protagonist, dons a little makeup (just enough to be “considered in costume and  so get in for a  dollar less”), leaves his Greenwich Village apartment, and sets off to a Harlem  ball. Once there  he greets his friends, dances to the jazz music, gets exceedingly drunk, flirts with  the band  leader, and eventually exchanges phone numbers with a handsome stranger.

But drag balls lacked the primary allure of the buffet flat: privacy. These  cross-dressing  celebrations were enormous events and many of those who attended were  spectators, there to  observe rather than participate. It was not unusual to see the cream of Harlem  society, as well  as much of the white avant-garde, in the ballroom’s balconies, straining their  necks to view the  contestants.

The costume balls, parties, speakeasies and buffet flats of Harlem provided  an arena for  homosexual interaction, but not for the development of homosocial networks.  One area where  black lesbians and gay men found particular bonds of friendship was within  Harlem’s  predominantly heterosexual entertainment world. While some entertainers, like  popular  composer Porter Grainger and choir leader Hall Johnson, kept their homosexual  activities  private, others were open with their audiences. Female impersonator Phil Black,  entertainer  Frankie “Half Pint” Jaxon, and singer George Hanna used elements of  homosexuality in their  professional acts and were still highly respected within the entertainment  community. Both  Black and Jaxon wore women’s clothing while on stage and Hanna even  recorded his “Freakish  Blues” without fear of censure.

For black lesbians, whose social options were more limited than those of  their male  counterparts, the support offered by the black entertainment world for  nontraditional lifestyles  was especially important. After leaving her family home in North Carolina, Mabel  Hampton  worked with her lover as a dancer in a Coney Island show before landing a  position at Harlem’s  famed Lafayette Theatre. By entering the show business life, Hampton was able  to earn a good  income, limit her social contact with men and move within a predominantly  female social world.  Many bisexual and lesbian black women, including Bessie Smith, Gladys Bently,  Jackie  “Moms” Mabley, Alberta Hunter, Gertrude “Ma” Rainey, Josephine Baker and  Ethel Waters  found similar advantages in the show business life.

Nearly all these women adopted a heterosexual public persona, most  favoring a “red hot  mama” style, and kept their love affairs with women a secret, but a few  acknowledged their  sexuality openly. Gladys Bentley, of course, was one exception. Another was Ma  Rainey.  Rainey was a short, squat, dark-skinned woman with a deep, earthy voice and a  warm, friendly  smile. She was the first vaudeville entertainer to incorporate the blues into her  performance and  has justifiably become known as the “Mother of the Blues.” Though married, the  flamboyant  entertainer was known to take women as lovers. Her extraordinary song, “Prove  It on Me  Blues,” speaks directly to the issue of lesbianism. In it she admits to her  preference for male  attire and female companionship, yet dares her audience to “prove it” on her.  Rainey’s defense  of her lesbian life was quite remarkable in its day, and has lost little of its  immediacy through  the years.

Claudia Lennear: Brown Sugar!

thSIQWY3R6 When backing vocalist Claudia, 63, dated Mick Jagger, she inspired one of the Rolling Stones’ greatest rock anthems, as she tells Pauline McLeod

“Around the time Brown Sugar became a hit for The Rolling Stones, Mick Jagger and I were always seen together in restaurants and nightclubs in Los Angeles. That’s why people thought the song was about me, and Mick later confirmed that it was.

The airport photo of the two of us was taken at Las Vegas and that moment stands out in my memory because it was the first time I’d ever been on a private plane. I was 17, maybe 18, and I thought we were just going out to the disco in LA. Then we arrived at the airport and I was immediately suspicious when I got to the plane and there were no other passengers apart from Mick, Keith Richards and the record producer Glyn Johns. But I wasn’t nervous. The Stones had a bad-boy image but they were perfect gentlemen.

We flew to Vegas and went to a casino where Mick taught me how to play baccarat then we hopped back on the jet and came home to LA.

Mick and I dated for a long while.

It was an on-off thing because of our different schedules, but we would talk all the time on the phone. He was a lot of fun to be with, although his public persona is quite different to the way he is in private. I found him a quiet guy who was very British, with good manners, so I was always smitten by his behavior.I was also the muse for David Bowie’s song Lady Grinning Soul.I’d seen David’s show in Detroit, he asked me for some input and we struck up a friendship after that. I had to pinch myself a few times. This was the top one per cent of Rock’n’Roll that

I just happened to make friends with. I was on quite a roll, wasn’t I?When I was a kid, my first love was language and I hoped to become a translator. But my family moved to California just as I hit my teenage years and I started going out to see bands. Then I began meeting the movers and shakers in the industry, and my career took off.

Ike Turner – Tina’s husband – hired me on the spot for his band. I was an “Ikette” for three years, until I had a little spat with Tina, but by that time

I was ready to move on anyway.

After that I was a background vocalist for Eric Clapton, George Harrison and Bob Dylan at the first ever benefit gig, The Concert For Bangladesh, at Madison Square Garden. I sang with all kinds of bands and had my own solo album released. But then the 80s came round and the music business began to change. Hip-hop and rap were the new ideas and I didn’t feel I had my finger on the pulse any more. I was a single mother by then, too, so I decided that maybe I should change my career and do something that would bring in a steady pay check.I’m a teacher now, using my language skills, and it’s funny because every time there’s a new intake of students, I can guarantee that one of them will come up to me with, ‘Miss Lennear, we saw this lady on YouTube who has your name…’Life has become rather surreal of late but so exciting because I’m featured in the Oscar-winning documentary about background vocalists, 20 Feet From Stardom. There are now offers coming in for me to sing again, I’m talking record deals and putting bands together, and I feel like I’m picking up where I left off. It is just so cool.”

20 Feet From Stardom is out now.

Writer :Pauline McLeod

 

Claudia Jordan vs Sex Tape

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NO Claudia Jordan is NOT behind this! I would NEVER want a sex tape of me out in the streets for everyone to judge me. I’ve gone 40 years without anything close to a nude photo of me out. I’ve never even sent a boyfriend/lover a topless photo. This is HORRIBLE!

Coco Austin:Coco-Liscious!

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Coco Austin has her very own  line of sex toys debuting this summer! 

Buffy The Body: Studying Aboard?

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Walter Vs. Kenya!

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Kenya Moore’s ex boyfriend Walter Jackson was allegedly caught in the bed with another man by his then wife, Charmaine Ward? This  comment listed below was left on http://www.rhymeswithsnitch.com/2014…l#comment-form

When is Walter going to admit that not a lot of younger women are really checking for him because they think he’s gay and corny? When is Walter going to admit that he’s had 2 divorces, one being that his wife left him because she caught him in bed with a man?!!!

There are people in ATL that dropped some tea about Walter recently and dude is an old loser!!! He is simply trying to ride Kenya’s coattails because she has moved on and doesn’t need his fugly arse anymore. I’ll take Kenya’s life anyday over living off the system with random men laying up with me! In that order!

Positive Girl: Body Count

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A female student in Kenya has revealed that she has infected a total of 324 men with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV).

The HIV positive girl, who attends the Kabarak University in Nakuru, is said to have been infected by a man at a party.

The unidentified 19-year old is allegedly aiming to infect a total of 2000 men in revenge.

According to reports:

The girl allegedly contacted Kenyan Scandals on Facebook and claimed she had something to confess.

After she was assured her identity was going to be protected (the Kenyan Daily Post, however, published a picture from her Facebook profile along with the article) she wrote: “Sep 22nd 2013 is a day I’ll never forget, we went clubbing in town and got drunk with some senior students then went back hostels for party round 2″.

She then explained that when she woke up, the morning after, she realized a boy called Javan had had sex with her while she was drunk.

“I only asked if he used a condom and he said yes, however when taking bath I noticed sperms down there, I wanted to commit suicide, I feared getting pregnant and HIV.”

When she discovered she was HIV positive, the girl confronted Javan who insisted he was clean.

“I was so depressed and took alcohol to die, I even bought poison, the pain was just unbearable how was I gone face the world, I let my parents down, I gave up on the world and just wanted to end my life. My future had been ruined, somehow someone had to pay,” the girl said.

“I accepted my fate and promised to make all men I come across suffer, I know I’m attractive and men both married and unmarried chase me left right and Centre.

“I buried the good girl in me and became the bad girl, my goal was to infect as many as possible,” she explained.

The girl then confessed she had already infected 324 men, 156 of which are students at the Kabarak University where she studies, the rest are married men, lecturers, lawyers, celebrities and politicians.

“Not a day passes without me having sex, mostly 4 people per day,” she continued in her confession. “Your day is coming, you men destroyed my life and I will make you and your people pay for it”

by Tutu Akinlabi

Josephine Baker: Trend Setter!

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Stormey Ramdhan: Death Row Tell-ALL

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Intro:

The book begins after a chance meeting during the summer of 1993, when Suge and I quickly began a courtship that would last for the next 20 years. In this book I will discuss the beginnings of our relationship as well as the sudden wealth, success, and the super stardom that came with knowing Suge and the artists who were putting out every hit from the Death Row Records catalogue of the early nineties.

As a naïve young woman who had lived an ordinary life until Suge became a part of it, there was more money and luxury around me than I had ever been accustomed to  during the first six months of knowing him. Our bond was instant, and Suge provided for me in every way possible.  I was young and wth us there was no real endgame– my entire  life plan until that fateful meeting had been to complete a degree in nursing  in North Carolina where I had a full scholarship. However,  absolutely nothing could prepare me for how much my life was going to change.

My main goal in finally telling my story is to inspire any young women who may currently find themselves in similar situations or were once in the same position as I was. In essence, Stormey: The Woman Behind The Most Feared Man In Hip Hop is a survivor story,  I believe this book will be an eye-opener for  young girls who may think they never have to worry because everything will be provided for them, I hope that upon learning about my story they will be able to realize the dangers in placing their entire livelihood in the hands of one person.

I also believe my story will resonate with the men and women who were involved in the West coast  rap scene at the same time I was, and had always wondered what occurred within the inner circle of  Death Row Records.

Finally I believe this book is my chance to humanize an image. Many people will relate to our story of unconditional love, innocence, lies, betrayal, jail, and ultimately abandonment, and I believe it’s a chance to display what the pressures of Hollywood can do to a family; how losing focus and bad decisions can end it all. This story will let everyone know how the downfall of a sole provider can affect the whole family, and show what people have to go through in putting the pieces of a family back together when it all falls down.

Pattie Boyd: The Ultimate Trouphy!

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Patricia Anne “Pattie” Boyd (born 17 March 1944) is a model, photographer and author from the United Kingdom, best known as the first wife of both George Harrison and Eric Clapton. In August 2007, she published her autobiography Wonderful Tonight. Her photographs of Harrison and Clapton, titled Through the Eye of a Muse have been exhibited in Dublin, Sydney, Toronto, Moscow, London and throughout the United States.

Boyd was born on 17 March 1944, in Taunton, Somerset, and was the first child to Colin Ian Langdon Boyd, and Diana Frances Boyd (née Drysdale), who were married on 14 September 1942. The Boyds moved to West Lothian, Scotland where her brother Colin was born in 1946. The Boyd family moved to Guildford, Surrey, where her sister, Jenny Boyd was born in 1947.Boyd’s youngest sister, Paula, was born at Nakuru hospital, Kenya, in 1951.The Boyds lived in Nairobi, Kenya, from 1948 to 1953, after her father’s discharge from the Royal Air Force. Boyd’s parents divorced in 1952, and her mother married Robert Gaymer-Jones in February 1953, in Tanganyika (now Tanzania). The family returned to England where Boyd gained two half brothers, David J.B. (b. 1954) and Robert, Jr. (b. 1955).

Boyd attended Hazeldean School in Putney, the St Agnes and St Michael Convent Boarding School in East  Grinstead, and St Martha’s Convent in Hadley Wood, Hertfordshire (where she received three GCE O level passes in 1961). Boyd moved to London in 1962 and worked as a shampoo girl at Elizabeth Arden‘s salon, until a client who worked for a fashion magazine inspired her to begin work as a model.

Boyd began her fashion career in 1962, modelling in London, New York and Paris. She was photographed by David Bailey and Terence Donovan, and appeared on the cover of Vogue. Boyd appeared on the cover of the UK and Italian editions of Vogue magazine in 1969, with other popular models of the day, such as Twiggy, who based her early modelling appearance on Boyd. Boyd was asked by Gloria Stavers to write a column for 16 Magazine, and appeared in a TV commercial promoting Smith’s crisps. She was cast for A Hard Day’s Night, where she met George Harrison.

Boyd exhibited her photos of Harrison and Clapton, at the San Francisco Art Exchange on Valentine’s Day 2005, in a show entitled Through the Eye of a Muse. The exhibition appeared in San Francisco and London during 2006, and in La Jolla, California in 2008.Boyd’s photography was shown in Dublin and in Toronto in 2008 and at the Blender Gallery in Sydney, Australia and in Almaty, Kazakhstan in 2009 and 2010. Her exhibit “Yesterday and Today: The Beatles and Eric Clapton” was shown in Santa Catalina Island in California, and at the National Geographic Headquarters in Washington, DC in 2011.

In 2007 Boyd published her autobiography, which includes some of her photographs, titled Wonderful Today in the UK; in the US it was published with the title Wonderful Tonight: George Harrison, Eric Clapton, and Me. In the United States, Boyd’s book debuted at the top of the New York Times Best Seller list.

1964, Boyd met Harrison during the filming of A Hard Day’s Night, in which she was cast as a schoolgirl.[12][23] Her only line in the film was asking “Prisoners?”, but she later appeared in the “I Should Have Known Better” segment. Boyd was “semi-engaged” to photographer Eric Swayne at the time, thus declining a date proposal from Harrison. Several days later, after ending her relationship with Swayne, she went back to work on the film and Harrison asked her out on a date for a second time. The couple went to a private gentlemen’s club called the Garrick Club, chaperoned by the Beatles’ manager, Brian Epstein. According to Boyd, one of the first things Harrison said to her on the film set was: “Will you marry me? Well, if you won’t marry me, will you have dinner with me tonight?”

Boyd had her first encounter with LSD in early 1965 when the couple’s dentist, John Riley, secretly laced her coffee with the drug during a dinner party at his home.[As she was getting ready to leave with Harrison, John and Cynthia Lennon, Riley told them that he had spiked their drinks and tried to convince them to stay.Outside, Boyd was in an agitated state from the drug and threatened to break a store window, but Harrison pulled her away. Later, when Boyd and her group were in an elevator on their way up to the Ad Lib club, they mistakenly believed it was on fire.

Later that year, Boyd moved into Kinfauns with Harrison.The couple were engaged on 25 December 1965, and married on 21 January 1966, in a ceremony at a registry office in Ashley Road, Epsom, with Paul McCartney as best man. Later, the couple went on a honeymoon in Barbados. In September, Boyd flew with Harrison to Bombay to visit sitar virtuoso Ravi Shankar, before returning to London on 23 October 1966. The following year, Boyd attended the Our World broadcast of “All You Need Is Love“.

Through her interest in Eastern mysticism and her membership in the Spiritual Regeneration Movement, she inspired all four Beatles to meet the Indian mystic Maharishi Mahesh Yogi in London on 24 August 1967, which resulted in a visit to the Maharishi’s seminar in Bangor, the following day. Boyd accompanied Harrison on the Beatles’ visit to the Maharishi’s ashram in Rishikesh, India, in February 1968.In March 1970, Boyd moved with Harrison from Kinfauns to Friar Park, a Victorian neo-Gothic mansion, in Henley-on-Thames.

In 1973, Boyd’s marriage to Harrison began to fail and she had an affair with Faces guitarist Ronnie Wood. She separated from Harrison in 1974 and their divorce was finalised on 9 June 1977.Boyd said her decision to end their marriage and leave Harrison was based largely on his repeated infidelities, culminating in an affair with Ringo Starr‘s wife Maureen, which Boyd called “the final straw”. Boyd characterised the last year of her marriage as “fuelled by alcohol and cocaine”, and claimed “George used coke excessively, and I think it changed him … it froze his emotions and hardened his heart.”According to Boyd, Harrison’s songs “I Need You” and “Something” were written for her.

Marriage to Eric Clapton

In the late 1960s, Clapton and Harrison became close friends, and began writing and recording music together. At this time Clapton fell in love with Boyd.His 1970 album with Derek and the Dominos, Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs, was written to proclaim his love for her, particularly the hit song “Layla“.When Boyd rebuffed his advances late that year, Clapton descended into heroin addiction and self-imposed exile for three years. Boyd moved in with Clapton and married him in 1979

. Her struggles within the marriage were masked by her public image with Clapton. Although Boyd drank and admits to past drug use, she never became an alcoholic or a drug addict like Clapton did. Boyd left Clapton in September 1984, and divorced him in 1988. Her stated reasons were Clapton’s years of alcoholism, as well as his numerous affairs including one with Italian model Lory Del Santo. In 1989, her divorce was granted on the grounds of “infidelity and unreasonable behaviour”.Boyd believes she was the inspiration for the songs: “Bell Bottom Blues” and “Wonderful Tonight“.

 

 

 

Shannon Moakler:Ex Wives Club!

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Reality show veteran Shannon Moakler (ex-wife of Travis Barker) will be joining the Hollywood Exes cast this Spring.

Justin Bieber: Days Are Numbered…..

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I’m Rick James (2009) : Release Date?

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The Rick James Story comes to the screen with all same unstoppable energy and outrageous humor that made him famous. It’s a non-apologetic celebration of the man and his music. The songs drive the journey, with many never before heard tracks and Rick’s hits like “Give It To Me Baby,” “Mary Jane.”

“Party All The Time” and “Superfreak.” The documentary is told by the people who knew him, partied with him and slept with him –from club owners in Buffalo to Hollywood’s biggest celebrities. But there’s a twist. Rick narrates his own life story.

From existing on camera footage Rick literally appears in the film, providing his uncensored opinions and commentary. Quotes from magazine and newspaper interviews are his narrative voice. So when Supermodel, Janice Dickinson, claims to be the inspiration for “Superfreak,” we’ll give you Rick’s take on what really happened that night at Studio 54. “Cocaine is a hell of a drug!” This is an autobiographical chronicle from the grave.  – Written by Downtown Movies

Tracee Ellis Ross: RUMP SHAKER!

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I’m not the type to post booty pics…I love my body but I try not to objectify it! But today I wanna…so I made a damn collage! The pic on the right made me n…auseous the first time I saw it. I thought my face looked crazy  but the pic is always popping up somewhere so I’m embracing it…crazy eyes, bra bulge and all!!! ‪#‎IWokeUpLikeThis‬ ‪#‎FeelingFrisky‬ ‪#‎Freedom2014‬

High Priced Escort: $20,000 a night!

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They have supermodel looks, an athlete’s stamina, the social skills of a diplomat — and sleep with the world’s wealthiest men. In the current Tatler Charlotte Edwardes meets London’s ‘top girls’

Dark red, you know the one, like blood. I forget the name. Anyway, he wants that on your toes. Light-pink manicure — fresh, innocent. So what’s next? Underwear, yes. He wants you in La Perla, off-white. Corsetry. Nothing whorish.”

Lauren [not her real name], 31, is mimicking her madam, putting on a breathy Parisian accent. “He’s a nice guy, veeery discreet. Remember: act like you know him. Packing, let’s see: a cocktail dress — black — whips, lube…”

She laughs, returning to her own voice, which has a faint Scandinavian lilt. “And that was my life for 10 years. I was  a high-class hooker. Call me a courtesan, call girl, escort, whatever. Basically I was a hooker. Just very well paid.” She looks at her ring, an enormous pear-shaped diamond. “Very well paid.”

There is an enduring fascination with illicit sex in high places. Perhaps it’s the access to some of the world’s richest, most powerful men, the secrets, the scandal, and, of course, the sexual prowess of these girls, which is riveting to us all.

Hollywood sirens like Marilyn Monroe (who made ****ographic films in her early career) and Joan Crawford (who worked in a strip club) reportedly sold sex too. And there was a media scramble to unmask the blogging call girl Belle de Jour (eventually revealed as Dr Brooke Magnanti), who was trading sex while studying for a PhD. She took her alluring nom de plume from the French novel of 1928, made into a film with Catherine Deneuve in 1967.

On condition of anonymity (“I don’t want my legs broken”), Lauren has agreed to talk about her life as a high-class prostitute. She earned £20,000 a night at her peak and £40,000 for a weekend.

“No one earns that money now,” she says. “Prices have gone down in the last five years. Changing times. My clients were on the Forbes list. Men who owned private islands, who were huge in property, international industry and oil. I’ve had dinner with royalty and major politicians. If you knew who! These clients were powerful, powerful men.’

Aristocrats? “No. They don’t pay. It’s new money. Having a hooker for them is nothing — like having butter on their bread. Sometimes their wives knew and turned a blind eye, sometimes they didn’t know.”

We are drinking tea in Lauren’s house in Chelsea. She lives with her husband, who was not a client — “I got lucky” — and who disapproves of her talking about her past.

She says her look — extraordinary pale hair, gas-blue eyes, peachy skin — was “the look everyone wanted. They don’t want skinny models, they want a little bit of …” she plumps her neat cleavage … “but nothing fake. No fake boobs, nails or eyelashes.”

Like others girls in her earnings bracket, Lauren is clever. She speaks Swedish, French and English. She used to read the Financial Times and The Economist to stay abreast of world events, as well as fashion magazines.

‘These clients want someone who can hold a conversation at a cocktail party or dinner — as well as everything else.”

Lauren says there are two major madams in London now, and they supply girls all over Europe and to the US. One is English — “big woman. Looks like a frog”. Lauren’s was French — “in her fifties, very elegant”.

She lives in north-west London and has dominated the industry for 20 years. She has “the best girls. They are seriously beautiful”.

How does her madam recruit? “She has people who work like model scouts, trawling clubs and bars and parties. And girls find her. Mostly they are models, strippers or dancers. Or students. They are smart and pretty. There are young actresses too. Sometimes recognisable faces.”

Lauren’s madam worked with a man who was “friendly with all the top model agencies. He’d pretend to be a Saudi prince and sleep with models. Then he’d tell them they could earn £10,000 a night and they’d say, ‘Oh really? Here’s my number’.”

At other times, he might proposition a pretty girl by offering large amounts of money for sex. “Ninety-nine per cent of the time she’ll tell him where to go. But the seed is planted. Next time she sees him, she might say, ‘Okay, tell me more’.”

Her madam would ask this same male friend to “test out” new girls. “He would report back and say, ‘She did this, she did that, she was good. I’d put her in the top bracket’. Or he’d say, ‘She’s a bit mediocre, so she might be a £1,000-a-night job as opposed to a £10,000’. There’s also a place in Paris she sends top girls to learn about sex — all the tricks. Paris is unbelievable for that stuff.”

Are the girls nervous? She laughs. “You can’t have nerves! These girls are tough. And there’s a numbness — it’s work. We don’t care about clients.”

Today, many of the girls are from Russia or Eastern Europe, she says, but others are from “all over — America, Brazil, South Africa, the Far East”.

The madam has around 100 girls on her books. “The very least you’ll be paying is £1,000 a night — those are the get-’em-in, get-’em-out service girls.” They’re booked for events like weekend shoots, or to sit in a nightclub making some sleazy guy look good. The mid-range are the majority — £5,000 a night upwards. Most of the mid-range guys aren’t mega-mega — they’re wealthy-banker league.”

Girls are sent “to etiquette classes, to learn how to sit, eat, which knife, fork, which glass for the white, for the red. It can’t be obvious to the other dinner guests that she’s a prostitute”.

She tells of a girl from a fabulous background who fell in love with a client. “He left his wife and three children for her.” Do many girls marry out of the game? “Not as many as you’d think,” she says. “It’s not Pretty Woman. But then again, a lot of society women started out this way.”

So what makes a £10,000–£20,000 girl? “Looks and training. We were professionals. We’d need to be funny, a laugh, party all night. Or cool and clever, discreet and well-mannered. You could never be fazed by power or money — or what you were asked to do.”

She says the top girls are “healthy”. “They go to the gym. They don’t do drugs, smoke or drink. Sometimes you’re up all night, so you need to look after yourself.”

The top 10 are “champion racehorses”. Others are “more hard-wearing”. “An absolutely stunning girl might not be so bright, or her English isn’t good. She’ll go to Arab clients. They want a beautiful girl they can lock in a room and bang, bang, bang.” She pauses. “But they pay well.”

Does that mean other clients treat girls well? “Yes, but…” She takes a deep breath. “A lot of these guys are seriously f***ed up. Their wives don’t do what they want. No woman in her sane mind would do half of it.”

She remembers being put in “an exceptionally expensive outfit so that the client could urinate on it”. One European royal “who has hookers all the time” is so rough that Lauren’s madam refuses to send her best girls. A famous film director offered to make Lauren famous “if I didn’t use a condom”. She refused.

“One guy — you definitely know his name — wanted to be a baby girl dressed as a ballerina. We had to smack him and put things up his bum.”

In addition to her fees (which were paid to the madam — “no money changes hands with the girl”), clients would take her shopping. “Getting jewellery is key. That’s an investment. The girls are big savers — they don’t spend their own money. If they start young — 18 is a good age — and do 10 to 12 years of hard work, they’re made.”

Retirement age is usually 28, “latest 30. They need to earn enough to put away for their future”. Lauren invested in property.

She says there’s an upper echelon of exclusive prostitutes who charge a premium for their celebrity. Lauren cites six, including a former Victoria’s Secret model who charged £25,000 an hour.

Through Lauren I meet Anna [not her real name], 24, who is still working as a prostitute. She wears Isabel Marant and Chanel. She’s braless under her white T-shirt but it doesn’t look tarty. She’s the kind of girl you might see hoicking her modelling portfolio around Paris.

She remembers the “cheap fake-fur coat” she was wearing when she stepped off the plane five years ago from Russia. Her modelling career failed because “there were a million girls like me at the agency. I couldn’t earn proper money”.

Anna refuses to discuss her madam but says she was introduced by another model. She’s been taken to Wimbledon, the Serpentine Party, Ibiza, Monaco and the Frieze Art Fair. Most of her clients are financiers — “hedge funders, CEOs, rich businessmen. I can make £5,000 a night. Sometimes £10,000 or £15,000 for a weekend.”

Clients want “everyone to think they’re going out with a model”.

“They don’t want you to dress like a hooker. You need to look natural. Don’t dress like their wives,” she smiles. “Although most of their wives try to dress like us.”

I ask Anna how she sees her future. “Maybe I’ll marry a rich man,” she says. “If not, I’ll start my own business.” Does she think she’ll ever fall in love? Have children? Have a normal life? “Maybe. I hope.” She shrugs. “It’s hard to think about it. Right now, I just want to make money.”

http://www.standard.co.uk/lifestyle/…r-9041116.html

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