Archives for : THE JACKSONS

Berry Gordy: On Michael Jackson

 

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“Well it was Suzanne DePasse who grabbed me one day and she said “there’s a kids group you gotta see. They’re auditioning in the next room and we just love them, and you’re gonna love them.”

I said that “I don’t have time. If fact, I don’t like kids groups. I don’t want kids groups. I’ve got Stevie Wonder who has a major entourage.” He had his mother, he had a tutor and a chaperon. A lot of people traveled with him. So, I said no. The last thing I want is a kids group, and she said “you’ll want them!” & I said “I won’t. I won’t.” And so, she kind of [dragged] me into  the audition room. And when I saw this kid doing all this stuff, he was doing a James Brown thing and he did a twirl and a split, and then she said “you still don’t like kid groups?” and I said “no I don’t…..get my camera, get my camera!”

When they got through, I noticed he was doing his thing, on stage he was one kind of person. He was like this master!. And then when he got through, he was very quiet and almost shy. But he stared at me, the other kids would get ready for the next song, they’d be playing with the instruments, and Michael was always there staring at me, really in an innocent way, watching every move I made. And finally, I went to them and they said “Are you gonna sign us?”.

I couldn’t make up my mind because I was concerned that, here’s a kid who was about eight years old, seven or eight years old, singing a Smokey song that seemed he had been living it for thirty years, so right away we were saying “this is an old man in a kid’s body”, because he sung ‘Who’s Lovin’ You’ better than Smokey, and Smokey did a phenomenal job, but this kid was like, something…he had been here before!

And then, after singing that, he went back into a child mode. I told Suzanne “they’re gonna need something that a kid would sing”, so I just kind of came up with a melody of my own. [sings a tune of I Want You Back] I said “he should sing something like that!” Then we did [‘ABC’], ‘The Love You Save’, and ‘I’ll Be There’, and that made history because no other group, I think, before or since, had their first four records go to number one.

So it was like a major feat, and they became, like, the biggest thing. Suzanne was responsible for dressing him up and she put on him one of those little hats, and they did the Sullivan Show. He used to complain to me about his childhood and I’d say “You don’t have such a bad childhood, Michael. I mean, you’re doing what you want to do.” If people could have that thing, passion, at an early age, eight or nine, and then do it for the rest of their life…my goodness! So that was…Michael.” –Berry Gordy

The Jackson Five: The Early Years

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The Jackson 5:This Day In Music

 

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On This Day In R&B History: 44 years ago today on July 9, 1970, the Number one cut on Billboards Soul Single Chart was, “The Love You Save”, by The Jackson 5. It took the top spot from The Moments awesome ballad, “Love On A Two Way Street”, where it spent 5 weeks as number one.

The History.
“The Love You Save” is a 1970 number-one hit single recorded by The Jackson 5 for the Motown label, as well as holding the number-one spot on the soul singles chart for six weeks. It held the number-one position on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart for two weeks, from June 27 to July 4, 1970 (in the UK Top 40 chart, it peaked at number 7 in August 1970). The song is the third of four Jackson 5 number ones released in a row (the others being “I Want You Back”, “ABC”, and “I’ll Be There”). “The Love You Save” also features side vocals of Jermaine Jackson singing alongside Michael in the final “Stop! The love you save may be your own” besides Marlon and Tito Jackson. Jermaine also was the lead vocalist on the B side, “I Found That Girl”.

The song’s lyrics feature Michael and Jermaine Jackson warning a “fast” girl to slow down and “stop!” because “the love you save may be your own!”

The opening exclamation of “stop” and the footstomps that complement the rhythm during the latter part of the song are allusions to the 1965 number-one Motown single by The Supremes, “Stop! In the Name of Love”. The Jackson 5 essentially replaced The Supremes as Motown’s main focus in the early 1970s.

Like most of the other early Jackson 5 hits, “The Love You Save” was written and produced by The Corporation, a team composed of Motown chief Berry Gordy, Freddie Perren, Alphonzo Mizell, and Deke Richards and recorded in Los Angeles, California, away from the old Motown studio at Hitsville USA in Detroit, Michigan.

“The Love You Save” was the second single from the second Jackson 5 album and significantly it was second single in a row to top The Beatles after the song ABC.

The Jacksons:Motown Monday!

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(L) to (R) Marlon, Jackie, Michael, Randy, and Tito.

Ali vs. The Jacksons

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The Jacksons: Studio Session

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DeVante Swing & Jermane:The Jacksons

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The Jacksons: Motown Monday!

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Formed in Gary, Indiana by Joe Jackson in 1964, the group originally included his five sons Jackie, Tito, Jermaine, Marlon and Michael. Originally Marlon and Michael played backup musician roles in the group until 1966 when Michael began sharing lead vocals with Jermaine. Professionally active since 1968, they signed with Motown Records in 1969. They became the first act in recording history to have their first four singles reach number one on the Billboard Hot 100.

Michael and Marlon Jackson: B-Ball Buddies!

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The JACKSONS: Motown Gold!

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The Jacksons attend the NAACP Image Awards, Los Angeles, California, November 19, 1970.

Motown Empire: West Grand Boulevard

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All of these houses were part of the Motown Empire on West Grand Boulevard. R to L
2644/46  Jobete Publishing Company [now the museum entrance] Bought 4/18/1961
2648  Recording studio [Hitsville] at the back of the building on the lower ground floor.  Also residence of Berry and Raynoma in upstairs rooms. Bought 8/2/1959…
2650 Offices of Berry Gordy/Esther Edwards and Ralph Seltzer. This is vacant ground, to the left of Hitsville. It burned to the ground in 1971. Bought 1/23/1962
2652/54  Motown Administration Bought 1/23/1962
2656  Motown Finance (white front) Bought 3/4/1965
2662/64  Motown Sales and Marketing building Bought 7/11/1966
2666/68  Motown Sales and Marketing building Bought 7/11/1966
2670/72  ITMI (International Talent Management Incorporated) Bought 7/5/1966
2657  Artist Development was located directly Across West Grand Blvd from the Motown Row. Bought 1/12/1966See More

The JACKSONS:Payday!

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Jermaine and Michael Motown Payday!

The Jacksons: Family Secrets part II by: Stacey Brown

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After a chance meeting as a young fan, Stacy Brown became friends with the bizarre family of Michael Jackson. For 25 years, he hung out at their Hayvenhurst estate in Encino, Calif., and even ghostwrote their memoirs. He previously wrote about Katherine Jackson’s letters to her son, in which she called Michael a homophobic slur. Here, in Part Two of his memories of life among the Jacksons, he talks about the family member he knows best — Jermaine, the jealous older brother of Michael.

“That was supposed to be me,” Jermaine Jackson said, for the 100th time, talking about the superstardom his younger brother enjoyed.

“That’s why I stayed at Motown. We had plans. But once Michael beat me to it, he made sure it would only be him.”

Of all the Jacksons, none was more tortured by the cult of Michael than Jermaine. He’d spend an entire day ranting against him. The next, he’d go on a talk show and defend him.

All the while was the subtext — it should have been me.

“I still say his timing was what made him the King of Pop,” Jermaine once said. Then he asked to borrow $500 to change the tires on his Mercedes.

Thy Brother’s ‘Wife’

If there’s one best example of how dysfunctional the Jackson family is, know this — Jermaine stole away, then married, the mother of his younger brother Randy’s children.

Randy met Alejandra Oaziaza in 1986, when she was about 17 and he was 24. Randy, seven years younger than Jermaine and three years younger than Michael, missed out on the heyday of the Jacksons’ Motown fame. Too young to appear in the Jackson 5, he nonetheless was enlisted in the family business and would tour with his brothers as he got older (as Michael went solo).

Randy and Alejandra dated for a long time, but never married, having two children — Genevieve and Randy Jr. But Randy proved a bit too immature for Alejandra, and while he was away from home, Jermaine moved in.

“Randy didn’t treat me like I was the one,” Alejandra told me. “I just thought that Jermaine was different, that he was more family oriented.”

In 1995, Jermaine and Alejandra secretly married, later having children of their own — Jaafar, Donte and Jermajesty.

Randy, of course, was devastated.

“Joe Blow down the street, but my brother? In the same house?” Randy seethed about the betrayal. “She’s a pig and my brother is a fool.”

Katherine, their mother, was not amused either and treated Alejandra like the help. Randy, meanwhile, withheld child-support payments, which Jermaine said he just couldn’t understand.

“He’s an a-hole,” Jermaine said of Randy. “He shouldn’t let his feelings for me or Alejandra come between taking care of his kids.”

Jermaine didn’t understand Randy’s anger in general.

“He needs to get over it and leave all the petty stuff behind and act like a man,” Jermaine said to me. This conversation lasted more than four hours and I had to reason with him that, “You not only took his woman, but you had children with her and you married her. There’s nothing petty about that.”

Jermaine just shrugged.

Things broke down so badly between the brothers that they refused to speak to one another. In 1997, I was in the kitchen with Jackie, Tito and Jermaine, who was feeling tortured over the thought of having to fly with and go on stage alongside Randy to accept their introduction as The Jackson 5 into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

“I just don’t want to do anything with Randy,” Jermaine said.

After about 15 minutes discussing how Jermaine should handle Randy at the awards presentation, I just had to speak up. “Dudes, this isn’t as much of a problem that you all are making it out to be,” I said. “Randy isn’t a member of The Jackson 5; he joined the group when you were called The Jacksons. The J-5 is being inducted.”

They stared incredulously and then whooped with joy.

Still, Randy didn’t let it go. He would always say to me, “Stacy, watch your women around my brother, you’re around him an awful lot, look what he did to me.”

Indeed, Jermaine’s mind had one track. On one visit to New York, where he was crashing with a friend, Jermaine was interviewed by the Fox News anchor Rita Cosby — then spent the rest of the weekend talking about how it was his mission to “do” her in a hotel bedroom.

Broke Casanova

Naturally, Cosby would have to pay for the room if it were to happen. Jermaine had absolutely no cash, as usual.

Later on, he told me he was hungry for some Burger King. Fine, I thought, we could do that. He said he’d pay this time. Of course, I doubted that but was certainly prepared to take him up on his offer. I ordered a Whopper meal while Jermaine simply ordered an apple pie.

“You got a coupon for that?” he asked me with a laugh. I told him to order what he wanted, that I’d pay. So he returned to the counter and asked for large fries and an iced tea to go with the pie.

The next time we spoke of Cosby, Jermaine shocked me by adding that he wanted to “bang Nancy Grace,” who is viewed as a family nemesis.

“Just one time with that heifer,” he said. “I bet she won’t say anything bad about Michael anymore. She’ll just be thinking about her one night with the man! Jermaine.”

That didn’t happen (as far as I know). But Jermaine did have many a conquest. In New York in 2001, for Michael’s 30th Anniversary Special concerts, Jermaine’s cellphone rang. Someone on the line told him Whitney Houston, a former lover of his, needed help.

He hung up and turned to me. “She’s like Michael. She’s messed up on those drugs,” he said. “You know I used to wear her a– out. I know she’d take me back and get rid of that (expletive) Bobby Brown. Plus, I should just get with her before she loses all that money she’s made.”

Whitney appeared sickly and rail thin at the concert and Jermaine said he was concerned. He said that after the second show, which was on Sept. 10, 2001, he’d get with her and seriously discuss moving to New Jersey or Atlanta to be with her.

“I feel it’s my duty with Whitney, man,” Jermaine said. “She told me she never stopped loving me. I can get with her and I should. I just don’t know how she’d act to have me in that bed instead of Bobby. I might be too much for her. But I’d get her off the drugs. She’d be high, but only on Jermaine.”

After the first show, which took place on Friday, Sept. 7, the family and invited guests gathered at Tavern on the Green in Central Park, where Michael, looking dazed, sat in an area that was roped off from his family. Macaulay Culkin sat with Michael.

“He just told me he wasn’t doing the second show,” Jermaine told me. “He’s high as a kite, but I’m going to slap him around and get him straight.”

Secret Muslim Wedding

One extracurricular relationship was somewhat more serious than the others. Jermaine was introduced to Lawanda, a friend of one his nieces, in the mid-1990s.

By then, Jermaine had converted to Islam. In 1999, while still married to Alejandra, he and Lawanda had a “wedding” at a local mosque. Jermaine would tell me later that he did it just to make her happy. While it wasn’t legal in the eyes of the government, Lawanda felt sure — she was now Jermaine’s wife.

At Michael’s anniversary concerts, Lawanda had had enough of being Jermaine’s No. 2. She came to me, crying. “Do you know who else’s anniversary it is?” she said. “Mine and Jermaine’s and he hasn’t said a word to me.” Then, in front of Jermaine, Randy and Alejandra’s young children, Lawanda tried to attack his lawful wife.

“That’s Jermaine for you,” brother Jackie would later say.

Even with two “wives,” Jermaine couldn’t help himself. One summer night in 2003, he and I were cruising Ventura Boulevard in Katherine’s late-model Mercedes. We stopped at Starbucks in Sherman Oaks where he introduced me to a neighbor named Sandy, who was waiting for him.

We got back into the car and Sandy followed in her jeep close behind. Jermaine called Alejandra and told her that Minister Louis Farrakhan was in town and that we were going by his hotel to speak with him.

We headed up into the pitch-black darkness of the Sepulveda Pass where we parked and Sandy parked right behind us. “Here, take the car and drive, come back in like an hour or so,” Jermaine said.

He hopped out and into Sandy’s car — and before I could make a U-turn, they were like two teens, ripping their clothes off and getting it on right there.

When I picked Jermaine up, he insisted we try and see Farrakhan so that his alibi would work. An aide to Farrakhan said he wasn’t available, so we returned to Hayvenhurst. Alejandra never asked about the meeting.

Jermaine divorced Alejandra in 2004, leaving the divorce papers behind in the house as he went on tour. In 2005, he married Halima Rashid, who comes from a wealthy Mideast family. Lawanda still complains to Jackie and Tito that she has to play second fiddle.

Jermaine knew plenty about playing second fiddle, though. He would go through periods of anger about his brother, then periods of remorse when he realized he would probably be broke without him.

n 1991, Jermaine released the song “Word to the Bad” that accused Michael of “changing his shade.” Michael wouldn’t speak to him for years. Jermaine then became his brother’s most vocal defender, dismissing every rumor about him on any show that would have him. Jermaine also would warn Michael of the family’s planned interventions and trips to therapy.

Still, Michael didn’t really pay Jermaine back — and kept putting off any talk of reunion concerts.

Finally, at the end of 2001, Jermaine decided to write a be-all, end-all book to pay his bills. And once his girlfriend, Lawanda, got hold of it, she was determined that Jermaine earn a $1 million advance.

The pitch was about Michael’s drug use and his penchant for keeping company with underage boys.

Michael’s assistant was frantic. “We want a retraction! We want a retraction! Call every publisher in America and tell them you made it all up and it’s not true,” she said desperately.

The Jacksons went into one of their famous family meetings and, oddly enough, several of them came away believing that Michael himself had made up the manuscript as a way to get attention.

But Jermaine said Michael obtained a copy of the manuscript. And Michael, who paid for the house at Hayvenhurst, would use it as an excuse to throw Jermaine out.

Jermaine backed off the book. He spent the next few years trying to make amends.

And I remember him sitting in an airport giddy during Michael Jackson’s trial on molestation charges in 2005.

“Michael said after the trial is over, we’re going on tour,” Jermaine said.

I told him, you’re thinking about concerts — your brother could be going to jail for life.

Jermaine just shook his head. Wasn’t going to happen, he said.

Then he started talking about the tour, what he would wear, what it would look like.

“Woo hoo, I love it.”

Jackson Family Secres Part I By: Stacey Brown

After a chance meeting as a young fan, Stacy Brown became friends with Jermaine Jackson — and later the rest of the Jackson family, including Michael. He helped write some of their memoirs, traveled on their tours, and even gave them loans (never to be repaid). Here, for the first time, Stacy explain what it’s like to be friends with the strangest family in America.

Randy Jackson, the second-youngest of the storied musical dynasty, likes to call his family “the black Kennedys.”

Maybe. But they certainly weren’t as smart with their ­finances as the Kennedys.

Even before this month, when the family lost a $40 billion lawsuit against AEG over the death of Michael Jackson, they’ve struggled with debts. Especially when the family’s richest members, Michael and Janet, decided to cut off their seven other siblings and parents out of whim or spite.

particularly low point came in 2003. No money was coming in, few of them had actual jobs and ­Janet gave but one gift to her siblings: free meal cards to Baja Fresh, a fast-food chain with which she had an endorsement deal.

I visited Rebbie, the oldest of the Jackson kids, in Vegas, to work on a book. It was Baja Fresh for breakfast, lunch and dinner. From there I drove to Hayvenhurst, the family’s estate in Encino, Calif., to meet Katherine, the matriarch, and Jermaine.

And for 2¹/₂ weeks it was . . . Baja Fresh.

Finally, for the sake of my stomach, I offered to take Katherine to Trader Joe’s. She loaded the cart with groceries, and I ended up with the bill — $700.

There was no “thank you.” The money was never repaid. Whatever courtesies are shown to them are met with the air of “You did what you ought to. We are the Jacksons!”

‘Why No Black Boys?’

As a friend, ghostwriter and confidant of the Jackson family for nearly 25 years, people ask how I could put up with such behavior.

It wasn’t easy — but there’s something seductive about the ­craziness

I first met patriarch Joseph and his sons Jermaine, Jackie and Tito in 1984. The brothers had just played the Victory Tour at Giants Stadium. I was 16 and went to the show with my girlfriend, Ameena, who was in love with Michael.

After the show, we traveled to the Helmsley Palace Hotel, and amazingly we got to speak to the Jacksons in the lobby. Ameena gushed and handed them a letter for her idol.

A couple of years later, I was visiting a friend in a hospital in Canoga Park, Calif. Randomly, I ran into Jermaine. “I know you,” he said. To my shock, he remembered that night in New York in detail.

We spoke for a long time and ­exchanged numbers. Two weeks later, he called me and invited me to Hayvenhurst, the seven-bedroom mansion Michael paid for. It’s full of family memorabilia, and a guesthouse is filled with dolls and stuffed animals.

I later became a journalist and, because of the friendship, I was enlisted as writer on two books — “Rebbie Jackson: The First Jackson” and “Legacy: Surviving the Best and the Worse,” the latter with Jermaine.

But for every little kindness, like Jermaine remembering me as a fan in the crowd, there was plenty of selfishness and bizarre behavior.

The Jacksons have been described as dysfunctional, but that’s an understatement. They loathe each other, particularly Michael — for whom they felt varying degrees of jealousy and disgust. The King of Pop rarely wanted anything to do with them, which only ­increased the psychosis.

They’re not the Kennedys, Katherine’s longtime assistant, Janice Smith, said to me once. “They are more like the Corleone family. And Michael is Michael Corleone.”

To his parents, Joseph and Katherine, however, Michael could do no wrong.

One day, after the brothers were complaining about Michael not including them in his plans, Joseph exploded: “Y’all are lazy. He did all the work, and he figured out that if he were going to do all the work, why bother with your lazy asses?”

Katherine would defend Michael constantly — to a point.

Watching a news report that showed Michael boarding an airplane with a young boy, Katherine murmured: “Why is it that he’s always got to have those little white boys around? Why doesn’t he ever have little black boys with him?”

I said, “Well, there was a time that he had little Emmanuel Lewis, who played Webster.”

“That was just for show, for the cameras,” Katherine said. “Those boys he flies around with ain’t nothing but little Jews.”

The question I desperately wanted to ask but did not was, “Well, would you rather him ­molest little black boys?”

Secret Therapy

The dysfunction culminated in 2002. Michael had played a 30th-anniversary celebration the year before. He paid Marlon Brando $1  million to appear. He paid his brothers $1,100 each. Then he canceled a promised tour with the ­entire Jackson family.

Randy figured the family needed therapy. Janet paid for it, and once a week the whole clan would pile into SUVs for secret trips to Malibu.

Rebbie began by talking about the abuse she allegedly suffered as a child in Gary, Ind., at the hands of Joseph, and which her mother witnessed. “Mother would simply say, ‘Joe, leave her alone tonight,’ ” Rebbie said.

Jackie, the second oldest, yelled at her for “bringing up things in the past that just pull us apart.”

“We’re in therapy!” Rebbie cried.

They all complained about Michael until finally the therapist said it was best if they didn’t even think about him.

“Michael is not your family, in his mind,” the therapist told them during those clandestine sessions. “Elizabeth Taylor is his mom, and you guys should move on.”

That sent Katherine over the edge. She already hated Taylor — on visits to Neverland Ranch, Katherine would decide where she’d have her lunch or dinner depending upon whether or not Liz had ever used the spot.

“I’m not sitting where she sat,” Katherine would say. “She’s ­stolen my son away.”

Joseph felt the same way about Motown boss Berry Gordy, who signed the singing children to the label in the 1960s.

“Michael better realize, it’s my blood running through his veins,” the family patriarch said. “Mine and nobody else’s. I’m his father, Katie is his mother.”

The therapy sessions ended. No one really felt better.

During this period, Jermaine was trying desperately to get on Michael’s good side. The brothers tried to trick Michael into attending therapy by saying there was going to be a “family day.” Jermaine tipped him off that it was a ruse.

Every single time a scandal ­involving Jacko broke, there we were, Jermaine and I, hotfooting it to “The View” or some other talk show.

When Michael dangled his newly acquired 9-month-old son, Blanket, off a hotel-room balcony in November 2002, Jermaine and I went to “old reliable,” Larry King, to defend Michael’s actions.

“Nobody complains about [crocodile hunter] Steve Irwin, who has his small kids around those dangerous animals,” Jermaine said.

Following that appearance, Michael’s assistant called.

Michael wanted to speak with Jermaine. “Don’t do any more television, Jermaine. Tell the family no more. I have this huge, huge television special coming out in February that is going to shock the world and change ­everything,” Michael said.

Ironically, the “huge television special” turned out to be the horrifying Martin Bashir documentary “Living with Michael Jackson,” which ultimately led to the molestation charges.

I remember watching it with great anticipation with Jermaine, Joseph and Katherine, and the looks on their faces were priceless.

When Michael pointed out that he’d rather climb a tree than have sex, Joseph let out a very disapproving groan. When the young accuser leaned against Michael, the warm feelings in the room quickly turned to ice. They knew what was coming.

Katherine’s Letters

And they certainly weren’t surprised by it.

Way back in 1993, when the first public allegations of child molestation surfaced against Michael, sister La Toya accused the rest of her family of being “silent collaborators.”

She said Katherine had written letters to Michael in which she called him a “damn f – – – – t” and knew about payoffs, for as much as $1 million, made out to the parents of one of Michael’s victims.

Katherine and several of her children held a press conference outside Hayvenhurst to denounce La Toya. “She’s trying to sell her brother down the river,” Kath­erine said.

A decade later, Jermaine and I were hanging out at Hayvenhurst in the courtyard near the swimming pool. Katherine emerged from inside the house.

“Jermaine, they got all of our things,” she said. The family had lost a civil judgment over a failed concert tour, and creditors took a storage locker full of memorabilia, including gold records.

“They got the letters, too, and those canceled checks,” Kath­erine said.

Normally I didn’t ask questions, but I had to ask what she was talking about. “The letters,” she said, as if I were supposed to know.

Jermaine completed the sentence for her, “Those letters in which mother called Michael a ­f – – – – t.”

I was stunned. Ten years later, I realized that La Toya really did tell the truth.

“You tell a lie long enough, people will believe it’s true,” Michael once said.

It could be the Jackson motto.

The Jackson 5: Classic!

 

artworks-000054248212-3ebs7p-t500x500“I Wanna Be Where You Are” is a song written by Arthur “T-Boy” Ross and Leon Ware for Michael Jackson, who took the song to number sixteen on the U.S. pop singles chart and number two on the U.S. R&B singles chart in 1972.

His third straight Top 40 pop hit during his early solo career in Motown, it was also the first collaboration between Ware and Ross, the younger brother of R&B singer Diana Ross.

This song would be one of Jackson’s most covered songs, with singers including Marvin Gaye, Willie Hutch, Jason Weaver and The Fugees. Ware and Ross would be famous together for penning the classic Marvin Gaye single, “I Want You” several years afterwards

The Jackson 5:Never can say goodbye!

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Never Can Say Goodbye” is a song written by Clifton Davis. Released as a single in 1971, it was one of the group’s most successful songs. The song has been covered numerous times, most notably in 1974 by disco diva Gloria Gaynor.

Mike and Janet: Family Affair!

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Early Van Dyke: Happy Birthday!

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Motown Revue:The Early Years!

Berry Gordy’s Motortown Revue. From left: Stevie Wonder, The Temptations, Eddie Kendricks, Elbridge Bryant, Uriel Jones, Otis Williams, Paul Williams, Melvin Franklin, Diana Ross, Robert Bullock, Patrice Gordy, Florence Ballard and Mary Wilson.

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Michael & Stevie: The Student Watching The Teacher!

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